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    Monitoring Nodes in the Fabric

    As an administrator or operator, you can use Junos Space to track the status of physical and logical components of deployed nodes in a fabric.

    Junos Space Network Management Platform supports SNMP Monitoring by an SNMP Manager for SNMP v1, v2c, and v3.

    The SNMP manager polls Junos Space to obtain information about the logical components of the nodes using an object identifier (OID) in SNMP v1 and v2, or v3 as a user. The response is provided by the Junos Space SNMP agent and the polled data is displayed in the Network Monitoring workspace.

    This topic contains the following sections:

    Viewing and Modifying the SNMP Configuration for a Fabric Node

    To view and edit the Junos Space SNMP configuration for self-monitoring:

    1. Select Administration > Fabric.

      The Fabric page appears.

    2. Select the node whose configuration you want to view or modify, and from the Actions menu, select SNMP Configuration.

      The SNMP Configuration window appears with the title bar displaying the IP address of the selected node.

    3. Set the SNMP configuration parameters as required, using Table 1 to guide you.

      Note: By default, the system load parameters are set to 4, which means that an alert is indicated only when all CPUs are under 100 percent load.

      Table 1: SNMP Configuration

      Setting

      Explanation

      Recommended Settings

      Default Value

      Enable SNMP over TCP

      Enables SNMP communication over TCP

      Note: By default, SNMP communication occurs over UDP.

      Cleared

      Cleared

      Monitor Web Service

      Includes monitoring the performance of the Junos Space GUI

      Note: This parameter is enabled only for the Junos Space VIP node.

      Selected

      Selected

      Monitor All Disks

      Includes all disks on the current Junos Space server

      Cleared

      Cleared

      Monitor RAID

      Enables Net-SNMP to monitor the RAID state

      When a RAID controller fault is detected, a trap is sent.

      Note: This field is not applicable to and is disabled for Junos Space Virtual Appliances.

      Selected

      Cleared

      Disk Usage %

      When the percentage of the disk in use exceeds the configured disk usage percentage, an alarm is triggered.

      5

      5

      System Load (1 min)

      When the average system load (over 1 minute) exceeds the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      4

      4

      System Load (5 min)

      When the average system load (over 5 minutes) exceeds the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      4

      4

      System Load (15 min)

      When the average system load (over 15 minutes) exceeds the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      4

      4

      System Location

      Location of the fabric node

      Actual geographical or other location

      unknown

      System Contact

      E-mail address to which the system sends notifications

      E-mail address of actual person

      root <root@localhost>

      Disk Mount Path

      Disk mount path that is to be monitored

      Note: This field is disabled if the Monitor All Disks field is selected.

      Actual path, if available

      /

      CPU Max Temp (mC)

      When the temperature exceeds the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      Note: This field is applicable only to the Junos Space hardware appliances (JA1500 and JA2500).

      50000

      50000

      CPU Min Fan (RPM)

      When the CPU fan speed goes below the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      Note: This field is applicable only to the Junos Space hardware appliances (JA1500 and JA2500).

      1000

      1000

      CPU Min Voltage (mV)

      When the CPU voltage goes below the configured value, an alarm is triggered.

      Note: This field is applicable only to the Junos Space hardware appliances (JA1500 and JA2500).

      1000

      1000

    4. Select Confirm to apply the SNMP configuration changes to the node, or select Cancel if you do not want to make any changes to the SNMP configuration.

    Table 2 shows the configuration parameters for monitoring disk usage.

    Table 2: SNMP Configuration Parameters: Monitoring Disk Usage

    Monitoring Disk Usage

    Parameter: Disk Usage (%)

    Default: 5%

    When the free disk space is greater than the configured threshold, the trap shown in Figure 1 is generated.

    Figure 1: Disk Usage Threshold Is Normal

    Disk Usage Threshold Is Normal

    Figure 2 shows the OID details for the trap generated when disk usage is normal.

    Figure 2: Trap Details When Disk Usage Normal

    Trap Details When Disk Usage
Normal

    When the free disk space is less than the configured threshold, the trap shown in Figure 3 is generated.

    Figure 3: Disk Usage Threshold Exceeds Configured Threshold

    Disk Usage Threshold Exceeds
Configured Threshold

    Figure 4 shows the OID details for the trap generated when disk usage exceeds the configured threshold.

    Figure 4: Trap Details When DIsk Usage Exceeds Configured Threshold

    Trap Details When DIsk Usage
Exceeds Configured Threshold

    Table 3 shows the configuration parameters for monitoring the CPU load average.

    Table 3: SNMP Configuration Parameters: Monitoring the CPU Load Average

    Monitoring the CPU Load Average (System Load)

    Parameter: CPU Load (1 min, 5 min, 15 min)

    Default Threshold Value: 4

    When the CPU Load Average threshold is less than or equal to the configured threshold limit, the trap shown in Figure 5 is generated:

    Figure 5: CPU Load Average Threshold Is Normal

    CPU Load Average Threshold Is
Normal

    Figure 6 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the CPU load is normal.

    Figure 6: Trap Details When CPU Load Average Threshold Is Normal

    Trap Details When CPU Load
Average Threshold Is Normal

    Figure 7 shows the traps generated when the 15 minute, 5 minute, or 1 minute CPU Load Average threshold is exceeded.

    Figure 7: CPU Load Average Threshold – Upper Limit Exceeded

    CPU Load Average Threshold –
Upper Limit Exceeded

    Figure 8 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the CPU load 5 minute average exceeds the threshold.

    Figure 8: Trap Details When CPU Load 5 Minute Average Exceeds Threshold

    Trap Details When CPU Load 5
Minute Average Exceeds Threshold

    Table 4 shows monitoring processes for the Junos Space Network Management Platform.

    Table 4: SNMP Configuration Parameters: Monitoring Processes

    Monitoring Processes

    Parameter: Node Management Agent (NMA)

    When the NMA process is up, the trap shown in Figure 9 is generated:

    Figure 9: NMA Is Up

    NMA Is Up

    Figure 10 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the NMA process is up.

    Figure 10: Trap Details When NMA Is Up

    Trap Details When NMA Is Up

    When the NMA process is down, the trap shown in Figure 11 is generated:

    Figure 11: NMA is Down

    NMA is Down

    Figure 12 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the NMA process is down.

    Figure 12: Trap Details When NMA is Down

    Trap Details When NMA is Down

    Parameter: Webproxy

    When the WebProxy process is up, the trap shown in Figure 13 is generated:

    Figure 13: WebProxy Is Up

    WebProxy Is Up

    Figure 14 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the WebProxy process is up.

    Figure 14: Trap Details When WebProxy Is Up

    Trap Details When WebProxy Is
Up

    When the WebProxy process is down, the trap shown in Figure 15 is generated:

    Figure 15: WebProxy Is Down

    WebProxy Is Down

    Figure 16 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the WebProxy is down.

    Figure 16: Trap Details When WebProxy Is Down

    Trap Details When WebProxy
Is Down

    Parameter: JBoss

    When the JBoss process is up, the trap shown in Figure 17 is generated:

    Figure 17: JBoss Is Up

    JBoss Is Up

    Figure 18 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the JBoss process is up.

    Figure 18: Trap Details When JBoss Is Up

    Trap Details When JBoss Is Up

    When the JBoss process is down, the trap shown in Figure 19 is generated:

    Figure 19: JBoss Is Down

    JBoss Is Down

    Figure 20 shows the OID details for the trap generated when JBoss is down.

    Figure 20: Trap Details When JBoss Is Down

    Trap Details When JBoss Is Down

    Parameter: Mysql

    When the Mysql process is up, the trap shown in Figure 21 is generated:

    Figure 21: Mysql Is Up

    Mysql Is Up

    Figure 22 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the Mysql process is up.

    Figure 22: Trap Details When Mysql Is Up

    Trap Details When Mysql Is Up

    When the Mysql process is down, the trap shown in Figure 23 is generated:

    Figure 23: Mysql Is Down

    Mysql Is Down

    Figure 24 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the Mysql process is down.

    Figure 24: Trap Details When Mysql Is Down

    Trap Details When Mysql Is Down

    Parameter: Postgresql

    When the Postgresql process is up, the trap shown in Figure 25 is generated:

    Figure 25: Postgresql Is Up

    Postgresql Is Up

    Figure 26 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the Postgresql process is up.

    Figure 26: Trap Details When Postgresql Is Up

    Trap Details When Postgresql
Is Up

    When the Postgresql process is down, the trap shown in Figure 27 is generated:

    Figure 27: Postgresql Is Down

    Postgresql Is Down

    Figure 28 shows the OID details for the trap generated when the Postgresql process is up.

    Figure 28: Trap Details When Postgresql Is Down

    Trap Details When Postgresql
Is Down

    Parameter: Free swap memory

    When the free swap memory is greater than the upper threshold limit, the trap shown in Figure 29 is generated:

    Figure 29: Swap Memory Usage Is Normal

    Swap Memory Usage Is Normal

    Figure 30 shows the OID details for the trap generated when swap memory usage is normal.

    Figure 30: Trap Details When Swap Memory Is Normal

    Trap Details When Swap
Memory Is Normal

    When the free swap memory is less than the upper threshold limit, the trap shown in Figure 31 is generated:

    Figure 31: Swap Memory Usage Threshold Exceeds Upper Limit

    Swap Memory Usage Threshold Exceeds
Upper Limit

    Figure 32 shows the OID details for the trap generated when swap memory usage is exceeds upper limit.

    Figure 32: Trap Details When Swap Memory Usage Exceeds Upper Limit

    Trap Details When Swap
Memory Usage Exceeds Upper Limit

    Table 5 shows the configuration parameters for monitoring Junos Space Network Management Platform hardware.

    Table 5: SNMP Configuration Parameters: Monitoring Linux Hardware

    Monitoring Linux Hardware

    Note: LM-SENSORS-MIB is not supported by the Junos Space Virtual Appliance, but only by the Junos Space Appliance. Therefore the threshold settings of CPU Max Temp (mC), CPU Min Fan (RPM) and CPU Min Voltage (mV) will not trigger any traps in the virtual appliance.

    Parameter: CPU min FAN (rpm)

    Default Threshold Value: 1500

    When the CPU fan speed is greater than the configured threshold (minimum fan speed), the trap shown in Figure 33 is generated:

    Figure 33: CPU Fan Speed Normal

    CPU Fan Speed Normal

    Figure 34 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU fan speed is normal.

    Figure 34: Trap Details When CPU Fan Speed Is Normal

    Trap Details When CPU Fan Speed
Is Normal

    When the CPU fan speed is less than the configured threshold (minimum fan speed), the trap shown in Figure 35 is generated:

    Figure 35: CPU Fan Speed Is Below the Configured Threshold

    CPU Fan Speed Is Below the Configured
Threshold

    Figure 36 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU fan speed lower than the configured threshold.

    Figure 36: Trap Details When CPU Fan Speed Is Below the Configured Threshold

    Trap Details When CPU Fan Speed
Is Below the Configured Threshold

    Parameter: CPU min Voltage (mV)

    When the CPU voltage is greater than the configured value, the trap shown in Figure 37 is generated:

    Figure 37: CPU Voltage Normal

    CPU Voltage Normal

    Figure 38 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU voltage is normal.

    Figure 38: Trap Details When CPU Voltage Is Normal

    Trap Details When CPU Voltage
Is Normal

    Default Threshold Value: 1000

    When the CPU voltage is lower than the configured value, the trap shown in Figure 39 is generated:

    Figure 39: CPU Voltage Is Lower Than Configured Threshold

    CPU Voltage Is Lower Than Configured
Threshold

    Figure 40 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU voltage is lower than the configured threshold.

    Figure 40: Trap Details When CPU Voltage Is Lower Than Configured Threshold

    Trap Details When CPU Voltage
Is Lower Than Configured Threshold

    Parameter: CPU Temperature

    When the CPU temperature is lower than the configured threshold, the trap shown in Figure 41 is generated:

    Figure 41: CPU Temperature Normal

    CPU Temperature Normal

    Figure 42 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU temperature is normal.

    Figure 42: Trap Details When CPU Temperature Is Normal

    Trap Details When CPU Temperature
Is Normal

    When the CPU temperature exceeds the configured threshold, the trap shown in Figure 43 is generated:

    Figure 43: CPU Temperature Exceeds The Configured Threshold

    CPU Temperature Exceeds The Configured
Threshold

    Figure 44 shows the OID details for the trap generated when CPU temperature is higher than the configured threshold.

    Figure 44: Trap Details When CPU Temperature Exceeds The Configured Threshold

    Trap Details When CPU Temperature
Exceeds The Configured Threshold

    Note: LM-SENSORS-MIB is not supported by the Junos Space virtual appliance, but only by the Junos Space Appliance. Therefore the threshold settings of CPU Max Temp (mC), CPU Min Fan (RPM) and CPU Min Voltage (mV) will not trigger any traps in the virtual appliance.

    Note: Junos Space supports RAID-related traps on a Junos Space appliance. The following is a sample trap:

    40948 	Normal [+] [-] 	2/4/13 09:54:14 [<] [>] 	space-node 	10.205.56.38 [+] [-] 	 
    uei.opennms.org/generic/traps/EnterpriseDefault [+] [-] Edit notifications for event
    Received unformatted enterprise event (enterprise:.1.3.6.1.4.1.8072.4 generic:6 specific:1001). 1 args: .1.3.6.1.4.1.795.14.1.9000.1="One or more logical devices contain a bad stripe: controller 1."
    

    Note:

    For an external SNMP Manager, the “Junos Space MIB” should be compiled to receive the following events in formatted manner:

    • Junos Space Node Down

      Figure 45 shows the OID details for the trap generated when Junos Space node is down.

      Figure 45: Trap Details Junos Space Node Is Down

      Trap Details Junos Space Node Is
Down
    • Junos Space Node Up

      Figure 46 shows the OID details for the trap generated when Junos Space node is up.

      Figure 46: Trap Details Junos Space Node Is Up

      Trap Details Junos Space Node Is Up
    • Delete Junos Space Node

      Figure 47 shows the OID details for the trap generated when Junos Space node is deleted.

      Figure 47: Trap Details Junos Space Node Is Deleted

      Trap Details Junos Space Node
Is Deleted

    Starting SNMP Monitoring on Fabric Nodes

    To start SNMP monitoring on one or more fabric nodes:

    1. Select Network Management Platform > Administration > Fabric.

      The Fabric page appears.

    2. Select the check box for each fabric node on which you want to start SNMP monitoring.
    3. From the Actions menu, select SNMP Start.

      The Confirm Start SNMP Agent dialog box is displayed.

    4. Click Yes.

      Junos Space begins SNMP monitoring on the selected fabric nodes.

      Note: This process might take a while.

    5. To view the status of SNMP monitoring on the selected fabric nodes, select Network Monitoring > Node List.

      The Network Monitoring > Node List page appears.

    6. Select the node on which you started the SNMP monitoring.

      The Junos Space node is represented as space-<number>.

      Figure 48 shows a sample view of network monitoring details for the selected fabric node.

      Figure 48: Network Monitoring Details for the Selected Fabric Node

      Network Monitoring Details for
the Selected Fabric Node

      Under Notification / Recent Events on the right of the Node List page, you see the results of the SNMP monitoring operation.

    Stopping SNMP Monitoring on Fabric Nodes

    To stop SNMP monitoring on one or more fabric nodes:

    1. Select Network Management Platform > Administration > Fabric.

      The Fabric page appears.

    2. Select the check box for each fabric node on which you want to stop SNMP monitoring.
    3. From the Actions menu, select SNMP Stop.

      The Confirm Stop SNMP Agent dialog box is displayed.

    4. Click Yes.

      Junos Space stops SNMP monitoring on the selected fabric nodes.

    Restarting SNMP Monitoring on Fabric Nodes

    To restart SNMP monitoring on one or more fabric nodes:

    1. Select Network Management Platform > Administration > Fabric.

      The Fabric page appears.

    2. Select the check box for each fabric node on which you want to restart SNMP monitoring.
    3. From the Actions menu, select SNMP Restart.

      The Confirm Restart SNMP Agent dialog box is displayed.

    4. Click Yes.

      Junos Space restarts SNMP monitoring on the selected fabric nodes.

    Adding a Third-Party SNMP V1 or V2c Manager on a Fabric Node

    To add a third-party SNMP V1 or V2c manager on a fabric node:

    1. Select Network Management Platform > Administration > Fabric > SNMP Manager.

      The SNMP Manager page appears.

    2. Click the Add SNMP Manager icon.

      The Add 3rd Party SNMP Manager dialog box is displayed.

    3. In the Manager IP field, enter the SNMP manager IP address.

      Note:

      • Depending on whether the Junos Space fabric is configured with only IPv4 addresses or both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, Junos Space Platform allows you to enter an IPv4 address or either an IPv4 or IPv6 address respectively for the SNMP Manager.
      • The IPv4 and IPv6 addresses that you use must be valid addresses. Refer to http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space for the list of restricted IPv4 addresses and http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-address-space for the list of restricted IPv6 addresses.
    4. In the Version field, select the SNMP version (V1 or V2c) .
    5. In the Community field, enter the community string.

      Any alphanumeric string (up to 254 characters) is acceptable, including spaces and symbols.

    6. Click OK.

      The newly added SNMP v1 or v2c Manager is displayed on the SNMP Manager page.

    Adding a Third-Party SNMP V3 Manager on a Fabric Node

    To add a third-party SNMP V3 manager on a fabric node:

    1. Select Platform > Administration > Fabric > SNMP Manager.

      The SNMP Manager page appears.

    2. Click the Add icon.

      The Add 3rd Party SNMP Manager dialog box displays.

    3. In the Manager IP field, enter the SNMP manager IP address.

      Note:

      • Depending on whether the Junos Space fabric is configured with only IPv4 addresses or both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, Junos Space Platform allows you to enter an IPv4 address or either an IPv4 or IPv6 address respectively for the SNMP Manager.
      • The IPv4 and IPv6 addresses that you use must be valid addresses. Refer to http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space for the list of restricted IPv4 addresses and http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-address-space for the list of restricted IPv6 addresses.
    4. In the Version field, select V3.
    5. In the User Name field, type the user name.

      The user name can contain a maximum of 32 alphanumeric characters including spaces and symbols.

    6. In the Authentication Type field, enter the authentication type (MD5 or SHA).
    7. In the Authentication Password field, enter the authentication password.

      Click the red information icon next to the Authentication Password field for information on the password rules.

    8. In the Confirm Authentication password, enter the authentication password again to confirm the password.
    9. From the Security Level list, select the security level:
      • noAuthNoPriv—Do not specify an authentication or privacy password.
      • authNoPriv—Specify only an authentication password.
      • authPriv—Specify both authentication and privacy passwords.
    10. In the Privacy Type field, enter the privacy type (AES or DES).
    11. In the Privacy Password field, enter the privacy password.

      Click the red information icon next to the Authentication Password field for information on the password rules.

    12. In the Confirm Privacy password field, enter the privacy password again to confirm the password.
    13. Click OK.

      The newly added SNMP Manager entry is displayed on the SNMP Manager page.

    Note: The trap settings for the SNMPv3 manager are not automatically updated in Network Monitoring. Therefore, to ensure that the Network Monitoring receives the traps from Junos Space, you must add the same settings manually in the /opt/opennms/etc/trapd-configuration.xml file. Table 6 displays the mapping between the parameters in the /opt/opennms/etc/trapd-configuration.xml file and the fields in the Add 3rd Party SNMP Manager page.

    The following is a sample configuration in the /opt/opennms/etc/trapd-configuration.xml file.

    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <trapd-configuration snmp-trap-port="162" new-suspect-on-trap="false">
     <snmpv3-user security-name="JunosSpace" auth-passphrase="auth-password" auth-protocol="MD5"/>
      <snmpv3-user security-name="JunosSpace" auth-passphrase="auth-password" auth-protocol="MD5"
          privacy-passphrase="privacy-password" privacy-protocol="DES"/>
    </trapd-configuration>

    Table 6: Mapping of SNMP V3 Settings

    Parameter in trapd-configuration.xml File

    Field in Add 3rd Party SNMP Manager Page

    security-name

    User Name

    auth-passphrase

    Authentication Password

    privacy-passphrase

    Privacy Password

    privacy-protocol

    Privacy Type

    Deleting a Third-Party SNMP Manager from a Fabric Node

    To delete a third-party SNMP manager configuration from a fabric node:

    1. Select Platform > Administration > Fabric > SNMP Manager.

      The SNMP Manager page appears.

    2. Select the SNMP manager configuration that you want to remove.
    3. Click the Delete SNMP Manager icon.
    4. To confirm the deletion of the SNMP manager, click Yes.

      The deleted SNMP manager is removed from the SNMP Manager page.

    Modified: 2016-06-20