Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

Navigation
Guide That Contains This Content
[+] Expand All
[-] Collapse All

    Adding and Managing an Individual Access Point

    You can explicitly configure access points on a controller with unique information to identify them. If you use this method to add all of your access points, it prevents rogue or neighbor access points from being added accidentally. Configured access points are persistent—the configuration is not lost if an access point loses contact with the controller.

    You can also use this feature to tailor an access point that is using a Radio profile and WLAN Service profile. Any configurations you make here take precedence over the profile settings.

    Note: The option to manage access points is only available when a controller or controller cluster is selected in the leftmost pane of Network Director and Logical View is the selected view.

    Tip: The feature Auto AP adds access points to controllers temporarily—see Understanding Auto AP Profiles and Creating and Managing Wireless Auto AP Profiles.

    This topic describes how to use Network Director to add or modify specific access points.

    Managing Access Points

    The option to manage access points is only available when a controller or controller cluster is selected in the leftmost pane of Network Director and Logical View is the selected view. From the Manage Access Points page, you can:

    • Manually add an access point to a controller by clicking Add. For detailed steps, see Adding an Access Point to a Wireless Network.
    • Modify an existing access point configuration by selecting it and clicking Edit.
    • Delete manually configured access points by selecting access points and then clicking Delete.

      Tip: You can delete access points that are in use—the clients from the access point re-associate to another access point.

    Table 1 describes the information provided about access points on the Manage Access Points page, which is available only in Logical View. The access points displayed are those managed by the controller or the cluster selected in the View pane.

    Table 1: Manage Access Point Fields

    Field

    Description

    AP Name

    Name given to the access point when the access point was created.

    AP ID

    Number from 1 through 9999 that identifies an access point.

    Model

    Juniper Networks model number of the access point

    Serial Number

    Serial number on the back of the access point

    Fingerprint

    Access points are configured with an encryption key pair at the factory. The fingerprint for the public key is displayed on a label on the back of the access point, in the format: RSA a:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa: aaaa:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa

    Tip: This field might be blank because a fingerprint is optional during access point configuration.

    Connection

    Distributed access points are connected to the network. Direct access points are connected to a controller port with no switch or router in between.

    Adding an Access Point to a Wireless Network

    You can explicitly configure access points so that the controller finds only those access points.

    To add individual access points to Network Director:

    1. Gather the following information:
      • Access point model—The model is listed on the back of the access point.
      • Access point IDs that have already been assigned, for example, 1, 2, and so on. You cannot repeat these numbers for new assignments.

        Tip: Some controllers keep track of the IDs that are in use, and suggest an unused ID for assignment.

      • Serial number located on the back of the access point.

        Tip: Serial numbers never contain spaces.

      • Optionally, for increased security, you can configure the access point fingerprint, which is an encryption key pair generated at the factory. The fingerprint for the public key is printed on a label located on the back of the access point in the following format: RSA a:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa: aaaa:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa
      • Optionally, if you added an external antenna or plan to add an external antenna to the access point, you need the model number of the antenna.

        Tip: If you do not specify an antenna, the access point’s internal antenna is used.

    2. Under Views, select Logical View.
    3. Click in the Network Director banner.
    4. Under the Wireless Network in the View pane, select either a controller or a cluster of controllers.

      Tip: Do not select the whole wireless network, a custom group, or an individual access point—these selections are not viable for adding an access point, because access points cannot be added to an entire network nor to individual access points. You do not see Manage Access Point under Key Tasks unless you select a controller or a cluster of controllers.

    5. Click Manage Access Point under Key Tasks in the Tasks pane.

      The Manage Access Points page is displayed with a list of all access points configured for the selected controller or controller cluster.

    6. Click Add.

      The Add AP window opens with the Access Point tab selected.

    7. On the Access Point tab, complete the basic access point settings as described in both the online help and in Specifying Basic Access Point Settings.
    8. Optionally, assign the access point to a local switching profile by clicking the tab Local Switching and completing the settings described in both online help and Enabling Local Switching on an Access Point.
    9. Optionally, configure the access point as a remote access point by clicking the tab Remote WLA and completing the settings described in both the online help and in Configuring an Access Point as Remote
    10. Optionally, reconfigure the default LLDP or LLDP-MED settings for the access point by clicking the tab LLDP and completing the settings described in both the online help and in Configuring Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) on an Access Point.
    11. Click the tab Radio 1 and reconfigure any radio information as described in both the online help and in Specifying Access Point Radio Settings.
    12. If it is displayed, click the Radio 2 tab and reconfigure that radio information as described in both the online help and in Specifying Access Point Radio Settings.
    13. Click OK.

      The access point is added to the Manage Access Points list on the screen.

    14. Add as many access points as needed, and then click Done.

      The access points you added now appear on the inventory list, but have not yet been added to the network—the access points become part of the network when you deploy the controller.

      Caution: Be sure to click Done to add each access point—otherwise, the configuration is lost.

    15. Deploy the controller or controller cluster associated with the access points, following the directions in Deploying Configuration to Devices.

      The access points become part of the network when you deploy the associated controller or cluster.

    Specifying Basic Access Point Settings

    To configure an access point, provide the basic access point information listed in Table 2. Required settings are indicated by a red asterisk (*) that appears next to the field label in the user interface.

    Table 2: Basic Access Point Configuration

    Field

    Description

    AP Name

    Type a unique name that identifies the access point, using up to 32 characters. Names must not contain special characters or spaces. Note that access point names automatically created by Network Director as part of device discovery or out-of-band changes might contain the underscore (_) character.

    AP ID

    An unassigned ID number appears by default. You can replace it with any ID number from 1 through 99999 that has not yet been assigned.

    Remote Site

    If the access point location is in a remote site (connected by a WAN link to the central network), select that Remote Site Profile from the list.

    Tip: Remote Sites are created by following the directions in Creating and Managing Remote Site Profiles.

    Model

    An access point model appears by default. Replace it with any access point model from the list—the list is based on the country code of the remote site.

    Connection

    Distributed access points (default) are connected to the network, usually through a switch. Direct access points are connected to a controller port with no switch or router in between. Ports depend on the controller model. Also, if the port is already connected to another direct access point, that port is not listed.

    Serial Number

    Type the serial number found on the back of the access point.

    Fingerprint

    You can type the fingerprint for the access point public key, which is displayed on a label on the back of the access point, in the following format: RSA a:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa: aaaa:aaaa:aaaa:aaaa

    Bias
    (default is high)

    If the access point is directly connected to the selected controller, bias does not matter. An access point always attempts to boot on AP port 1 first, and if a controller is directly attached on AP port 1, the access point boots from there regardless of the bias settings.

    Bias matters for access points indirectly connected to the controller through an intermediate Layer 2 or Layer 3 network. If the access point is indirectly connected to the selected controller, indicate that the access point has a high bias for the controller (default), has a low bias, or is sticky which means it will continue to use the current controller for the active data link even if another controller configured with high bias becomes available.

    For more information, see Understanding Access Point Bias for Controllers.

    Enable Firmware Update
    (enabled by default)

    When the controller receives a later version of access point firmware, the access point will be updated unless you remove the check mark to disable updates.

    Force Image Download
    (disabled by default)

    Select for automatic image updates. When the controller receives a later version of the access point image, the access point will be updated.

    Enable Blink
    (disabled by default)

    Blink mode makes an access point blink so that it is easy to identify. When blink mode is enabled, the health and radio LEDs alternately blink green and amber. By default, LED blink mode is disabled. Once enabled, blink mode continues until you disable it. Changing the LED blink mode does not alter operation of the access point. Only the behavior of the LEDs is affected.

    LED Mode
    (automatic by default)

    Set LED mode either to auto (default) to have LEDs operate normally, or to static to have the LEDs operate with normal flashing patterns converted to a static On pattern. You can also turn the LEDs off to disable flashing.

    Description

    Enter up to 256 characters to describe the access point.

    Location

    Enter up to 256 characters to describe the location of the access point.

    Contact

    Enter up to 256 characters of contact information for a network administrator.

    WLA Communication Timeout
    (default is 25 seconds)

    Number of seconds (default is 25) that the access point times out after the last communication.

    Power Mode

    On some access point models, power mode can be set to auto or high.

    Antenna Mode

    Antenna mode is derived from the access point model. Options are displayed only for access points with external antennas. Access points with internal antennas only have antenna mode set to Internal.

    Enable Data Security
    (default is disabled)

    Check to configure an access point for data path encryption. In cluster mode, the primary seed (PS) ensures that an access point with data security enabled is not assigned a primary access manager (PAM) or secondary access manager (SAM) that does not support this feature. If such a controller is not located on the network, the access point remains unassigned.

    High Latency Mode
    (default is disabled)

    Check to enable high latency mode. Bandwidth and latency are two elements that affect network speed. Latency refers to delays typically encountered when processing network data. A low latency network connection is one that has small delay times, while a high latency network typically encounters long delays. High latency mode configures attributes that can mitigate the association problems on a high latency network.

    Next, optionally click the Local Switching tab to enable local switching for the access point. For directions, see Enabling Local Switching on an Access Point.

    Enabling Local Switching on an Access Point

    You can enable Local Switching on the access point. Local Switching means that packets switch directly from access points to the wired network instead of passing through a controller. For information about local switching, see Understanding Local Switching on Access Points.

    To configure Local Switching settings on the access point from the Local Switching tab of the Add AP process, complete the settings in Table 3.

    Table 3: Assign Local Switching Profile to Access Point

    Field

    Description

    Enable Local Switching
    (disabled by default)

    Select this option to have packets switch directly from access points to the wired network.

    Enable WLA Tunneling: WLA tunneling extends the WLC-WLC tunnel feature to allow access points that are using local switching to create and terminate client VLAN tunnels. This eliminates the need for a VLAN on every access point.

    Tunnel Affinity: Indicate a tunnel affinity from 0 through 10. When tunneling is enabled, an access point can create a tunnel to a controller or to another access point, depending on the configured tunnel affinity. By default, a VLAN on the controller has an affinity of 5 and a VLAN on an access point has an affinity of 4. If the tunnel affinity is the same, then the node with the lowest load is selected as a tunnel endpoint.

    Next, optionally click the Remote WLA tab to make the access point a remote access point. For directions, see Configuring an Access Point as Remote .

    Configuring an Access Point as Remote

    You can mark the access point as remote, which means that the access point is connected by a WAN link to the central network. For information about remote access points, see Understanding Remote Access Points.

    To configure an access point as a remote access point from the Remote WLA tab of the Add AP process, configure the settings shown in Table 4.

    Table 4: Configuring a Remote Access Point

    Field

    Description

    Enable Remote WLA
    (disabled by default)

    Select Enable Remote WLA to mark the access point as remote. A check mark appears in the corresponding box and the remaining options become available.

    Outage Duration: Number of hours between periodic checks of the state of the controller connection.

    Connection Evaluation Period: Maximum number of seconds that the access point remains in outage mode before rebooting.

    Path MTU
    (default is zero)

    Indicate the size of the maximum transmission unit (MTU), which is the largest packet that a network protocol can transmit. Default is zero.

    Next, optionally click the LLDP tab to assign Link Layer Discovery Protocol to the access point. For directions, see Configuring Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) on an Access Point.

    Configuring Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) on an Access Point

    Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is a link layer protocol used by network devices to advertise identity, capabilities, and neighbors. It also provides additional TLVs for capabilities discovery, network policy, Power over Ethernet (PoE), and inventory management.

    Link Layer Discovery Protocol-Media Endpoint Discovery (LLDP-MED) is an extension to LLDP that operates between endpoint devices such as IP phones to provide support for voice over IP (VoIP) applications. LLDP-MED endpoints determine the capabilities of a connected device and whether those capabilities are enabled.

    Tip: LLDP and LLDP-MED cannot operate simultaneously on a network. By default, access points send only LLDP packets until LLDP-MED packets are received from an endpoint device. The access point then sends out LLDP-MED packets until it receives LLDP packets.

    For information about LLDP, see Understanding LLDP and LLDP-MED.

    To configure LLDP on the access point from the LLDP tab of the Add AP process, complete the configuration described in Table 5.

    Table 5: LLDP Settings for an Access Point

    Field

    Description

    LLDP Mode
    (enabled by default)

    Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) on an access point is enabled for transmission by default, which means that access point transmits its identity, capabilities, and neighbors with LLDP. If you do not want the access point to use LLDP, disable LLDP by selecting Disable instead of transmit (TX).

    Note: You can enable both LLDP Mode and LLDP-MED Mode, but only one can operate at a time. By default, network devices send only LLDP packets until LLDP-MED packets are received from an endpoint device. The network device then sends out LLDP-MED packets until it receives LLDP packets.

    LLDP-MED Mode
    (enabled by default)

    Media Endpoint Discovery is an enhancement of LLDP that is disabled by default. To have the access point transmit its identity, capabilities, and neighbors with the LLDP-MED protocol, enable LLDP-MED Mode and complete the two configuration options for LLDP-MED.

    Note: You can enable both LLDP Mode and LLDP-MED Mode, but only one can operate at a time. By default, network devices send only LLDP packets until LLDP-MED packets are received from an endpoint device. The network device then sends out LLDP-MED packets until it receives LLDP packets.

    Power via MDI: Enable Power via Media Dependent Interface (MDI) to have the access point also convey power information, such as the type of power, power priority, and the amount of power required by the device. Information is collected on the Ethernet interface.

    Inventory: Enable Inventory to have the access point also transmit detailed inventory information to a controller. Inventory information includes hardware revision, firmware version, software version, serial number, manufacturer name, model name, and asset ID.

    Tip: You can also configure LLDP on a controller—see Configuring a Controller .

    Next, click the Radio 1 tab to configure the access point’s radio information. For directions, see Specifying Access Point Radio Settings.

     

    See Also

     

    Configuring Bonjour on an Access Point

    Bonjour Zero configuration IP networking enables users to find printers, network resources, or music sharing on a network. If you are running Bonjour on your network, users can instantly find printers, or a friend’s network game or music device, and share those files with someone else. These Bonjour services are available in Network Director—Apple TV, Internet printer, or Digital Auto Access Protocol (iTunes).

    For more information, see Understanding Bonjour.

    To configure Bonjour on the access point from the Bonjour tab of the Add AP process, complete the configuration described in Table 6.

    Table 6: Bonjour Settings for an Access Point

    Enable Bonjour
    (disabled by default)

    When you enable Bonjour, you must also provide a Location where Bonjour (mDNS) is located.

    Task: Add services to this Bonjour configuration

    To add a Bonjour service to access point:

    Tip: You can add multiple services.

    1. Click Add under Service Name.

      The phrase Enter service here is displayed. Enter one of the following:

      • Host Name Glob—Indicate a host for the Bonjour Profile. An asterisk like this * (the default) is a wildcard meaning all hosts.
      • Service Name—Select one or more services for Bonjour, either Apple TV, Internet printer, or Digital Auto Access Protocol (iTunes):
        • _airplay._tcp—Apple TV
        • _ipp._tcp—Internet printer
        • _daap._tcp—Digital Auto Access Protocol (iTunes)
      • Service Type—Select either Discover (default) or Advertise.
      • VLAN Scope—Select either Global or Local.
        • Local—Service information is only relevant on the local VLAN.
        • Global—Service information is relevant beyond the local VLAN.
    2. Click OK.

      The Bonjour service is added to the list of Service Names.

    3. Click OK.

    Specifying Access Point Radio Settings

    Access points can have one radio or two radios, depending on the model. Provide the settings for each radio, as described in Table 7.

    Table 7: Access Point Radio Settings

    Field

    Action

    Radio Type

    Select one of the available radio types on the access point: 11a, 11b, 11g, 11na, or 11ng. For a description of these radio types, see Understanding the IEEE 802.11 Standard for Wireless Networks.

    Radio Mode

    Radio Mode is Enabled by default. Turn off the radio by selecting Disabled. Put the radio into sentry mode, which means the radio scans for interference but does not transmit user traffic, by selecting Sentry.

    Antenna Type

    If you did not add any external antenna, leave the default Internal selected to use the built-in antenna for this radio. If you added an antenna to the radio, select one of the supported add-on antenna models from the list.

    Antenna Location

    Leave the location set to Indoor if you are using an indoor antenna for this radio—this includes the built-in antenna. If you added an outdoor antenna, select Outdoor from the list.

    Auto Channel

    Auto channel is enabled by default, which means that the access point will switch channels depending on the optimum available choices. You can disable auto channel by removing the check mark and then assign a channel for the access point.

    Channel Number

    If Auto Channel is disabled, select a channel number for the radio. The channel numbers listed here are based on the country code. For more information about radio channels, see Understanding Wireless Radio Channels.

    Note: If auto-channel is enabled, the radio might change channels after it is deployed. For more information about radio channels, see Understanding Adaptive Channel Planner.

    Auto Power

    Auto Power is enabled by default, which means that the access point will modify its power depending on the circumstances. You can disable Auto Power by removing the check mark and then assign a transmit power for the access point.

    Transmit Power

    If Auto Power is disabled, select the transmit power for the radio. The range available is 1 milliwatt (dBm) through 20 milliwatts (dBm). Transmit power is limited by some country codes. Unless you have a reason to do otherwise, we recommend that you set the power as high as possible.

    Note: If auto-power is enabled, the radio might change transmit power after it is deployed. For more information about automatic power tuning , see Understanding Auto Tune Power Policy for Wireless Radios.

    Max Transmit Power

    Each radio has a maximum transmit power in decibels, which is set to Default unless you change it. If the default option is chosen, the maximum power setting that RF Auto-Tuning can set on a radio is the highest setting allowed for the country of operation or highest setting supported on the hardware, whichever is lower. You can reset maximum transmit power by selecting a number from 1 through 20 decibels to indicate the maximum power setting RF Auto-Tuning can assign to the radio.

    Load Balancing

    Load balancing distributes a workload across multiple entities, in this case wireless radios, to achieve optimal utilization, maximize throughput, minimize response time, and avoid overload. For more information, see Understanding Load Balancing for Wireless Radios.

    Enable Load Balancing

    Load balancing for radios is enabled by default, which means that the radio shares traffic equally with other radios in a load-balancing group. To turn off load-balancing on this radio, remove the check mark.

    Load Balance Group Name: When load-balancing is enabled, you can create a load-balancing group and assign this radio to it by selecting this option and providing a group name. You can also add this radio to an existing load-balance group by selecting this option and providing an existing group name.

    Enable Rebalance Clients: Optionally, when load-balancing is enabled, you can enable client rebalancing for this radio. This means that the access point radio can disassociate client sessions and rebalance them whenever a new access point radio is added to the same load-balancing group.

    If the access point has two radios, click the Radio 2 tab to add the other radio’s information. Then, click OK.

    Modified: 2018-01-23