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    Network Device Traffic Report

    The Network Device Traffic report is a standardized report generated in Network Director to show the device traffic for a device. There are two portions of the report: a report header and the report body.

    This topic describes:

    Network Device Traffic Report Header

    The contents of the report header are found in Table 1.

    Table 1: Network Device Traffic Report Header

    Field

    Description

    NETWORK DIRECTOR REPORT:

    The type of report; In this case, the Network Device Traffic report.

    Generated On:

    The date and time the report ran. The date format is: [Day of the Month] [Month] [Year]. The time format follows the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). For example: 07 December 2012 11:35 PM PST.

    Generated By:

    The username of the user that generated the report.

    Report Name

    The name of the report assigned by the user when the report was created.

    Scope

    The report is generated from this view and node in the network.

    • Perspective—Can be Logical view, Location view, or a device view of the network.
    • Node—Represents the selected object upon which the report is based.

    Note: If you select a device that is down, the report might not contain any data.

    Report Filters

    The period of time specified for data collection.

    Network Device Traffic Charts

    The body of the Network Device Traffic report is a series of four colored charts that show a comparison of data or trend information about the packets. The charts are:

    • Unicast Vs Non-unicast

      This pie-chart shows the percentage totals for packets over the specified period of time at the node:

      • Inbound unicast packets
      • Inbound non-unicast (such as broadcast and multicast) packets
      • Outbound unicast packets
      • Outbound non-unicast packets

      The percentage of non-unicast packets is normally less than that of unicast packets. If the percentage of non-unicast packets is as high or higher than that of the unicast percentage, it means that too many non-unicast packets are being sent in the network.

    • Unicast Vs Non-Unicast Trend

      This line chart shows the trend in unicast and non-unicast packets over the specified period of the report. The x axis shows the polling period; the y axis shows the number of packets. Use this chart to see if the plots are symmetric or asymmetric. It can also be useful for identifying unusual patterns.

    • Traffic Trend

      This line chart shows the overall trend of all packets over the specified period of time. The x axis shows the polling period; the y axis shows the number of packets. Use this chart to find abnormalities in the traffic trend.

    • Error Trend

      This line chart shows the errors over the specified period of time. An error is caused by a missing packet. Missing packets can be a result of: packet loss in the network, uncorrectable packet out of sequence, packet length error, jitter buffer overflow, or jitter buffer underflow. Use this chart to see the overall trend in errors. The x axis shows the polling period; the y axis shows the number of errors.

    Modified: 2018-01-24