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    Specifying Custom Radio Profile Setup Settings

    The Custom Setup tab includes seven sets of parameters, listed at the left of the screen: Basic Settings, RF Scanning, Auto Tune, Voice Configuration, 802.11 Attributes, Adaptive Channel Planning, and Snooping Map.

    Enter the custom Radio profile settings described in these topics. Required settings in the topics are indicated by a red asterisk (*) that appears next to the field label in the user interface.

    Basic Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Enter the Basic Settings for the custom Radio profile described in Table 1.

    Table 1: Radio Profile Custom Setup Basic Settings

    Field

    Action

    Name and Description

    Values for these attributes are copied from the Quick Setup tab if they were completed there.

    If attributes were not copied, type a unique name that identifies the profile.

    Use up to 32 characters for wireless profile names. Profile names must not contain special characters or spaces. Note that profiles automatically created by Network Director as part of device discovery or out-of-band changes may contain the underscore (_) character.

    DFS Channel
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to enable dynamic frequency selection (DFS) channels to meet regulatory requirements as assigned by the access point country code.

    RFID
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to enable tracking of mobile assets by using RFID tags.

    U-APSD
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to enable Unscheduled automatic power save delivery (U-APSD), which buffers unicast packets on access points until clients request transmission. There are two methods for requesting buffered unicast packets from access point radios, either the Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM) method (default) or the Spectralink Voice Priority (SVP) method.

    Note: Only clients that are using power save mode are affected by this setting.

    Countermeasures
    (default is None)

    Select which clients receive countermeasures, None, All or Rogue (only rogue devices). Countermeasures are packets sent by a radio to mitigate interfering devices.

    Note: Configuring the actual countermeasure actions is not supported in Network Director.

    Client TX Power Constraint
    (default is None)

    Select Link Balance to balance power between access points and clients on all client links. To accomplish this, access points transmit the maximum power setting to potential clients. You might want to limit client power in places like auditoriums, airports, and dorms where there are a high number of clients.

    WLAN Service Profiles

    Enable Weight Queing

    If you configure SSID medium time weights, you are guaranteeing a minimum service level to specific Service profiles on a radio. Medium time weights determine the relative transmit utilization of the radio between Service profiles. You can configure the weight from 1 to 100 with 100 as the sum of all configured weights.

    Task: Select Existing WLAN Service profiles

    Click Select under WLAN Service Profiles and then select any or all listed WLAN Service profiles to associate with this Radio profile. Radios will broadcast the SSIDs named in the WLAN Service profile(s).

    Task: Create and Add a New WLAN Service profile

    1. Click Create under WLAN Service Profiles.

      The Create WLAN Service Profile for Radio Profile window opens.

    2. Provide the following settings for a WLAN Profile:
      1. Profile Name—Type a unique name that identifies the profile.

        Use up to 32 characters for wireless profile names. Profile names must not contain special characters or spaces. Note that profiles automatically created by Network Director as part of device discovery or out-of-band changes may contain the underscore (_) character.

      2. Description
      3. Service Profile Type—Select 802.1X, Voice, Web Portal, Open Access or Custom.
      4. SSID—Provide an SSID to be broadcast to clients.
    3. Indicate security settings for the WLAN Profile by selecting either RSN, WPA, or Static WEP. Provide this additional information:
      1. RSN—Select either AES (CCMP) or TKIP.
      2. WPA—Select either AES (CCMP) or TKIP. Select either 802.1X Authentication or PSK Authentication or both.
      3. Static WEP—Provide one or more WEP keys.
    4. Indicate authentication settings for the WLAN Service profile. Enable either Configure Authentication Settings, or Select Existing Authentication.

      If you enabled Configure Authentication Settings, select either Create RADIUS Server or Select RADIUS Server.

      If you selected Create RADIUS Server, provide this information:

      1. RADIUS Server Address
      2. Secret

      If you enabled Select Existing Authentication, click Select, indicate one of the listed profiles, and then click OK. The Authentication Profile name appears in the Authentication Profile field in the Create WLAN Service Profile for Radio Profile window.

    5. Indicate authorization settings for the WLAN Service profile. Select either Configure Authorization Settings, or Select Existing Authorization.

      If you enabled Configure Authorization Settings, provide either a VLAN Name or a VLAN Pool Name.

      If you enabled Select Existing Authorization, click Select, indicate one of the listed profiles, and then click OK. The Authorization Profile name appears in the Authorization Profile field in the Create WLAN Service Profile for Radio Profile window.

    6. Click OK.

      The selected WLAN Service profile appears on the list of WLAN Service Profiles on the Basic Setup tab.

    7. Click Done or, to reconfigure default advanced settings, click Advanced Setup.

    Next, click the RF Scanning tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions RF Scanning Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    RF Scanning Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Enter the RF Scanning settings for the custom Radio profile described in Table 2.

    Table 2: Radio Profile Custom Setup RF Scanning Settings

    Field

    Action

    Mode
    (default is active)

    Select Passive to make scanning detect only active WLAN devices. (Passive scanning cannot be turned off.) Select Active to make scanning detect all wireless devices, even if they are not currently transmitting.

    Channel Scope
    (default is regulatory)

    Select the range of access point radio channels to be scanned and audited—Regulatory (channels required by country of operation), All, or Operating (active channels).

    CTS-to-Self
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to have access points send clear-to-send packets to themselves on the new channel before switching an access point radio to another channel. This action confirms that both the send and receive are working on the access point before it attempts communication with other devices.

    Spectral Scan
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to enable access points to scan their coverage area for all electronic devices, not just wireless devices.

    Next, click the Auto Tune tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions Auto Tune Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    Auto Tune Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Power tuning computation is performed on the access point itself without any help from the controller. Access points listen for nearby access points on the same channel and then adjust their power to provide good coverage while avoiding co-channel interference. For more information, see Understanding Auto Tune Power Policy for Wireless Radios.

    Enter the Auto Tune settings for the custom Radio profile described in

    Table 3: Radio Profile Custom Setup Auto Tune Settings

    Field

    Action

    Version

    Power Auto Tuning parameters differ, depending on which version of MSS you are using. Select either Power & Channel Tuning (Below MSS 8.0 version), Power & Channel Tuning (Below MSS 9.0 version), or Power Policy (MSS 9.0 and above versions).

    Auto Tune Settings

    Version
    (default is Max Coverage)

    (Power Policy 9+)

    Only when you selected the version Power Policy for MSS Version 9.0 and newer, you can base your power policy on Max Coverage, Cell Parity, or Max Channel Capacity. Both Cell Parity and Max Channel Capacity have additional configuration options that become available when you select them.

    Cell Parity Power (2GHz and 5GHz)—When the Power Policy for MSS Version 9.0 and newer parameter Power Policy is set to Cell Parity, you can set the same power on all radios, based on the radio capability and regulation. You can configure per-band power levels and the system accommodates these levels as allowed by regulatory constraints. For an equally spaced access point deployment, this power policy is better suited as it will not compute transmit power at run time. However, for very dense deployments, this policy may cause co-channel interference. The power values for 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz are different and all radios of the same channel band are set to equal power levels as allowed by the hardware, the channel, and the country code. By default, the power level is the highest value that can be used in common by all radios under the profile.

    Tune Channel
    (default is enabled)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, Adaptive Channel Planner (ACP) dynamically assigns the radio operating channel so that the wireless network can efficiently adapt to the RF environment conditions. Dynamic assignment can be changed when significant changes are measured in the interference level or in the network topology. Eventually, Wi-Fi bandwidth is maximized and maintains the efficiency of communication over the wireless network. Tune Channel is enabled by default, but you can disable it. It is also overwritten if a static channel set is configured. When Tune Channel is disabled, channels on the access points are static and require manual intervention to change the channels.

    Tune Transmit Power
    (default is disabled)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 9.0, Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0 )

    Click Enable to enable automatic power tuning for radios. Access point radios are initially set to maximum power for the country’s regulatory domain. Radios maintain maximum power, which is recommended, unless a conflict or other event causes them to change. For more information, see Understanding Auto Tune Power Policy for Wireless Radios.

    Ignore Clients
    (default is disabled)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, the Ignore Clients option can allow MSS to change the channel on a radio even if the radio has active client sessions. When Ignore Clients is disabled, MSS does not change the channel unless there are no active client sessions on the radio.

    Tune Channel Range
    (default is Lower Bands)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, you can limit the channels used to the Lower Bands, or you can indicate All Bands.

    Channel Tuning Interval
    (default is 3600 seconds)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, you can change the interval between channel tuning opportunities. Every 3600 seconds, MSS examines the RF information gathered from the network and determines whether the channel needs to be changed to compensate for RF changes.

    Channel Tuning Holddown
    (default is 900 seconds)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, you can change the Channel Tuning Holddown. Channel holddown avoids unnecessary channel changes due to highly transient RF changes, such as activation of a microwave oven.

    TX Power Backoff Timer
    (default is 10 seconds)

    (Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0)

    Only when you are using MSS versions earlier than 8.0, you can change the interval at which radios reduce power after temporarily increasing the power to maintain the minimum data rate for an associated client. At the end of each power-backoff interval, radios that temporarily increased their power reduce it by 1 dBm every 10 seconds. The power backoff continues in 1 dBm increments after each interval until the power returns to expected setting.

    Power Tuning Interval
    (default is 600 seconds)

    Power Policy 9+ for Max Channel Capacity Power Policy, Power & Channel Tuning < 9.0, Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0

    Power Tuning Interval is the parameter for Auto Tune, no matter which version of MSS you are using, that sets the number of seconds between reevaluations of power. Power changes can take place only after an evaluation or when an anomaly occurs. You can change the wait interval between evaluations from the default 600 seconds.

    Power Ramp Interval
    (default is 60 seconds)

    Power & Channel Tuning < 9.0, Power & Channel Tuning < 8.0

    Power Ramp Interval is the rate at which power is increased or decreased on radios in a Radio profile until the optimum power level calculated by RF auto-tuning is reached. You can change the 1 dBm increment to increase and decrease in larger or smaller steps.

    Minimum Power

    Power & Channel Tuning < 9.0, Power Policy 9+ for Max Channel Capacity Power Policy

    Select a number from 1 through 24 to indicate the minimum power applied to a radio. The min-power setting places a floor under the power range that radios use when attempting to maintain power parity with each other. For instance, if the highest common power level is limited by a radio with a regulatory or hardware limit of 10 dB, and you set the min-power level to 12 dB, all radios capable of 12 dB are set to use 12dB even though it is higher than the highest common power level. If a minimum power level is configured that is higher than a configured maximum power setting, the minimum power level is rejected. If a minimum power level is configured that is higher than the upper limit of radios used by the Radio profile, the configuration is accepted, but a warning is issued.

    Maximum Power

    (Power Policy 9+ for Max Channel Capacity Power Policy)

    Only when you are using MSS 9.0 or newer with Max Channel Capacity as the Power Policy, you can set radios’ maximum power to a value that depends on the radio model.

    Power Density

    (Power Policy 9+ for Max Channel Capacity Power Policy)

    Only when you are using MSS 9.0 or newer with Max Channel Capacity as the Power Policy, you can set power density to Low, Medium, or High.

    Next, click the Voice tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions Voice Configuration Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    Voice Configuration Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Enter the Voice settings for the custom Radio profile described in Table 4.

    Tip: If Voice configuration QoS mode is set to SVP, SVP is also given highest priority and the CAC settings still apply.

    Table 4: Radio Profile Custom Setup Voice Settings

    Field

    Action

    QoS Mode
    (default is WMM)

    Sending (WMM) and Receiving (Policing) Packets provides levels of service that vary with the type of data sent on an access point. By default, access points deliver the same service to all packets—you must configure admission control for CAC to work properly. For more information, see Understanding Call Admission Control.

    Select WMM (default) quality-of-service mode to prioritize VoIP traffic, unless you are using Spectralink phones. In that case only, select SVP. In either case WMM CAC configurations apply to traffic. The only difference is that SVP also gets highest priority when SVP is selected. .

    Note: When SVP is selected instead of WMM, SVP voice transmission also has highest priority in addition to voice and video. The rest of the WMM QoS settings still apply. SVP is needed only for legacy equipment.

    Background

    Background has the longest fixed wait time before forwarding queued packets, giving it lowest priority.

    ACM Mode

    Enable ACM Mode to enable background admission control mode for downstream traffic.

    ACM Limit

    Indicate a value from 1 through 100 for the ACM Limit to limit downstream background mode to a percentage of bandwidth.

    ACM Policing

    Enable ACM Policing to enable background mode for upstream traffic.

    Best Effort

    Best effort provides QoS by providing more resources than are needed by the network. This simple method provides high quality service to all packets on an IP backbone and is therefore frequently used on the network core.

    Enable ACM Mode to enable best-effort admission control mode for downstream traffic.

    Indicate a value from 1 through 100 for the ACM Limit to limit downstream best-effort mode to a percentage of bandwidth.

    Enable ACM Policing to enable best-effort mode for upstream traffic.

    Voice

    Voice transmission has the shortest fixed wait time before forwarding queued packets, giving it highest priority.

    ACM Mode

    Enable ACM Mode to enable voice admission control mode for downstream traffic.

    ACM Limit

    Indicate a value from 1 through 100 for the ACM Limit to limit downstream voice mode to a percentage of bandwidth.

    ACM Policing

    Enable ACM Policing to enable voice mode for upstream traffic.

    Video

    Video streaming has the shortest fixed wait time before forwarding queued packets, giving it highest priority.

    Video 2 ACM Mode

    Select Video 2 ACM Mode to enable video admission control mode for downstream traffic.

    Video 2 ACM Limit

    Type a value from 1 through 100 for the Video 2 ACM Limit to limit downstream video mode to a percentage of bandwidth.

    Video 2 ACM Policing

    Select Video 2 ACM Policing to enable video mode for upstream traffic.

    Next, click the 802.11 Attributes tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions 802.11 Attributes Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    802.11 Attributes Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Enter the 802.11 Attributes settings for the custom Radio profile described in

    Table 5: Radio Profile Custom Setup 802.11 Attributes Settings

    Field

    Action

    802.11 Attributes

    Beacon Interval

    Indicate the rate at which a radio advertises beaconed SSID(s). The interval can be a value from 25 ms through 8191 ms. The default is 100 ms.

    DTIM Interval

    Number of times after every beacon that a radio sends a delivery traffic indication map (DTIM). An WLA access point sends the multicast and broadcast frames stored in its buffers to clients who request them in response to the DTIM. The DTIM interval applies to both the beaconed SSID and the unbeaconed SSID.

    Maximum Receive Lifetime

    Indicate the number of milliseconds that a frame received by a radio can remain in buffer memory. The time can be from 500 ms (0.5 second) through 250,000 ms (250 seconds). The default is 2000 ms (2 seconds).

    Maximum Transmit Lifetime

    Indicate the number of milliseconds a frame scheduled to be transmitted by a radio can remain in buffer memory. The time can be from 500 ms (0.5 second) through 250,000 ms (250 seconds). The default is 2000 ms (2 seconds).

    Long Preamble Length

    Indicate a long preamble length. An 802.11b/g radio generates unicast frames to send to a client with the specified preamble length. An 802.11b/g radio always uses a long preamble in beacons, probe responses, and other broadcast or multicast traffic.

    Rate Enforcement

    When data rate enforcement is enabled, clients transmitting at the disabled rates cannot associate with the access points.

    RST Threshold

    Indicate the maximum length a frame can be before a radio uses the Request-to-Send/Clear-to-Send (RTS/CTS) method to send the frame. The RTS/CTS method clears the air of other traffic to avoid corruption of the frame due to a collision with another frame. Default is 65535.

    Fragment Threshold

    Specify the longest length a frame can be before a radio transmits it by fragmenting it into multiple frames. The threshold can be a value from 256 through 2346. The default is 2346.

    802.11n Attributes

    802.11n Channel Width

    Indicate the width of an 802.11n channel—either 20 MHz or 40 MHz.

    Next, click the Adaptive Channel Planning tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions Adaptive Channel Planning Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    Adaptive Channel Planning Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Adaptive Channel Planner makes channel tuning decisions based on feedback from RF scanning—for more information, see Understanding Adaptive Channel Planner and Understanding Wireless Scanning.

    Enter the Adaptive Channel Planning settings for the custom Radio profile described in

    Table 6: Radio Profile Custom Setup Adaptive Channel Planning Settings

    Field

    Action

    Task: Configuring 802.11b/g Channels

    By default, 802.11bg radios use channels 1, 6, and 11 because these common settings prevent interference. To change the channels used, select a number and move it into the Available or Selected columns with the arrows. For more information about wireless channels, see Understanding Wireless Radio Channels.

    Task: Configuring 802.11a Channels

    You can configure the 802.11a radio on an access point to allow certain channels to be available or unavailable. If you select lower bands, MSS selects a channel from the lower eight bands in the 802.11a range of channels: 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, or 64. If you select all-bands, MSS selects a channel from the entire 802.11a range of channels: 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 60, 64, 149, 153, 157, or 161.

    Note: When a controller learns that an access point 802.11a radio has detected radar on a channel, the auto-tune module immediately switches the radio to another channel. If radar is detected on a radio that has its auto-tune channel feature disabled, the radio goes out of service as required by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI).

    Next, click the Snoop Map tab for custom Radio profiles and follow the directions .Snooping Mapping Settings for Custom Radio Profiles.

    Snooping Mapping Settings for Custom Radio Profiles

    Enter the Snooping Mapping settings for the custom Radio profile described in Table 7.

    Table 7: Radio Profile Custom Setup Snoop Map Settings

    Field

    Action

    Task: Map Snooping to a Controller

    You must have an existing Snooping profile before you can map it to a Radio profile. To create a Snooping profile, see Creating and Managing RF Snooping Filter Profiles.

    To map snooping to a Radio profile, click Select on the Snooping option of the Advanced Setup tab, select a profile from the list, and then click OK.

    What To Do Next

    Next, assign this Radio profile to radios. For directions, see Assigning a Radio Profile to Radios.

    Note: Assigned settings from any profile, including this one, have lower priority than settings made directly to a controller or an access point. For more information, see Adding and Managing an Individual Access Point and Configuring a Controller .

     

    Related Documentation

     

    Modified: 2016-12-16