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    Creating and Managing Wireless Auto AP Profiles

    An Auto AP profile is a set of configurations applied to access points on a controller that have not been specifically configured. These access points were, instead, discovered by the controller. If you create an Auto AP profile, then assign and deploy the Auto AP profile to a controller, that controller applies the Auto AP profile to any access points that are discovered. If the access point is not seen by the controller at any point, the Auto AP configured access point is removed from the list of access points—they have no persistent configuration on the controller. For more information about Auto AP profiles, see Understanding Auto AP Profiles.

    Note: A controller can have only one Auto AP profile assigned.

    If you do not want an Auto-AP profile applied to access points, you can add and configure individual access points by Adding and Managing an Individual Access Point.

    This topic describes:

    Managing Wireless Auto AP Profiles

    From the Manage Auto AP Profiles page, you can:

    • Configure one Auto AP profile per controller by selecting a controller in the View pane, and then clicking Add. For directions, see Creating a Wireless Auto AP Profile.
    • Modify an existing Auto AP profile by selecting it and clicking Edit.
    • Assign an existing Auto AP profile to a controller.
    • Edit the assignment of an Auto AP profile to a controller by selecting the profile and clicking Edit Assignment.
    • View the current assignments for a profile by selecting the profile and clicking Details.
    • Delete an Auto AP profile by selecting a profile and clicking Delete.

      Tip: You cannot delete a profile that is in use—that is, assigned to access points.

    • Clone a profile by selecting a profile and clicking Clone.

    Table 1 describes the information provided about an Auto AP profile on the Manage Auto AP Profiles page.

    Table 1: Manage Auto AP Profiles Fields

    Field

    Description

    Profile Name

    Name given to the Auto AP profile when the profile was created.

    Device Family

    Wireless (controller)

    Description

    Any description provided during creation of the Auto AP profile.

    Enable Auto AP

    Indicates whether the Auto AP profile is enabled or disabled.

    Assignment State

    Indicates whether or not the Auto AP profile is deployed to a controller.

    Creation Time

    Date and time when this profile was created.

    Last Updated Time

    Date and time when this profile was last modified.

    User Name

    The username of the user who created or modified the profile.

    Tip: Some columns might be hidden—this is configurable. To show or hide fields listed in the Manage Authorization Profiles table, click the down arrow on the field header, select Columns, and select or clear the check box adjacent to the field that you want to show or hide.

    Creating a Wireless Auto AP Profile

    In Network Director, you can automatically configure profiles for access points discovered by a controller. This Auto AP profile becomes the default configuration for all access points that are discovered but not configured on the controller. This way, all access points, even those not configured by you, have a configuration. The Auto AP profile will also act as a template if you convert an Auto AP to a configured, persistent access point.

    At minimum, when creating an Auto AP, you must specify a profile name, and also provide the names of an associated VLAN Profile and a Radio profile. You can use default settings for the rest of the Auto AP profile, or you can optionally change or add Auto AP profile configurations such as:

    • Radio Type
    • Access points’ bias for the controller
    • Radio mode (enabled, disabled, or sentry) for each radio
    • Radio profile for each radio
    • LLDP settings
    • Remote access point settings for outage duration and connection evaluation
    • Blinking
    • Data Security
    • High latency mode
    • Bonjour Profile
    • Automatic firmware updates
    • Local switching tunnel settings
    • Associated VLAN profiles

    To create an Auto AP profile:

    1. Under Views, select either Logical View, Location View, Device View or Custom Group View.

      Tip: Do not select Datacenter View or Topology View.

    2. Click in the Network Director banner.
    3. In the Tasks pane, expand Wireless, expand Profiles, and then click Auto AP .

      The Manage Auto AP Profiles page opens, displaying the list of currently configured Auto AP profiles.

    4. Click Add.

      The Create Auto AP Profile for Wireless Controllers (WLC) wizard opens. The wizard has four sections, Basic Settings (this one is selected), LLDP & Remote AP Settings, Advanced Settings, and Review.

    5. Complete the sections of the Auto AP wizard described in both online help and Specifying Basic Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile, Specifying LLDP & Remote AP Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile, Specifying Advanced Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile, and Reviewing a Wireless Auto AP Profile .
    6. Click Finish.

      The Auto AP profile is added to the list of Auto AP profiles.

    Next, assign the Auto AP configuration to one or more controllers, following the directions Assigning an Auto AP Profile to Controllers.

    Specifying Basic Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile

    For an Auto AP in use (either enabled or in sentry mode), the required basic Auto AP profile settings are a name for the profile and a reference to a Radio profile for each radio—for the rest of the settings, you can use the default settings.

    The basic settings for the Auto AP profile are described in Table 2. Required settings are indicated by a red asterisk (*) that appears next to the field label in the user interface.

    Table 2: Wireless Auto AP Basic Settings

    Field

    Description

    Profile Name

    The Auto AP profile name. can consist of up to 32 characters with no special characters other than _ - (underscore or dash).

    Description

    Optionally provide up to 255 characters.

    Enable Auto AP
    (default is enabled)

    Clear this check box to disable Auto AP without deleting the Auto AP profile.

    Radio Type
    (default is 802.11g)

    Radio type applied to radios with no other specific configuration. Select 802.11a, 802.11b, or 802.11g. For more explanation, see Understanding the IEEE 802.11 Standard for Wireless Networks.

    Bias
    (default is High)

    Select High, Low, or Low-Sticky bias. Bias matters only for access points indirectly connected to the controller through an intermediate layer 2 or layer 3 network. An access point always attempts to boot on AP port 1 first, and if a controller is directly attached on AP port 1, the access point boots from there regardless of the bias settings. Set the access point’s bias to High or Low for the controllers in this profile. Alternately, set the bias to Low-Sticky to have the access point continue to use the current controller for the active data link even if another controller configured with high bias becomes available. For more explanation, see Understanding Access Point Bias for Controllers.

    Radio Settings

    If an access point has two radios, both Radio 1 and Radio 2 are displayed and can be reconfigured from the defaults.

    Radio Type
    (default is 802.11g for Radio 1 and 802.11a for Radio 2)

    Radio type applied to each radio that has no other specific configuration. Select either 802.11a, 802.11b, or 802.11g.

    Radio Mode
    (default is Disabled)

    Radio mode defines the functioning state of the radios in this profile. Select Sentry or Enabled to enable the radios. Select Disabled to disable the radios.

    Tip: A radio in sentry mode scans for interference but does not transmit user traffic.

    Radio Profile

    A controller needs a Radio profile if radio mode is set to either Enabled or Sentry. Provide the name of an associated Radio profile. For more explanation, see Understanding Radio Profiles. To create a Radio profile, see Creating and Managing a Radio Profile.

    Tip: To avoid failure during deployment, select a Radio Profile if the Radio Mode is enabled for any of the radios.

    Click either Next or LLDP & Remote AP Settings to continue configuring the Auto AP. Follow the directions Specifying LLDP & Remote AP Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile to complete that section of the wizard.

    Specifying LLDP & Remote AP Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile

    To configure the LLDP & Remote AP Settings for the Auto AP profile, enter the settings described in Table 3.

    Table 3: Wireless Auto AP LLDP & Remote AP Settings

    Field

    Description

    LLDP Settings

    Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is a Layer 2 protocol that enables a network device to advertise its identity and capabilities on the local network. These attributes are used to discover neighbor devices. The attributes contain type, length, and value descriptions and are referred to as type-length-values (TLVs). Devices that support LLDP use TLVs to receive and send information to neighboring devices. Details such as configuration information, device capabilities, and device identity can be advertised using this protocol.

    LLDP Mode
    (default is TX)

    Select either transmit (TX) or None to specify the LLDP operational mode on access points. Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is a link layer protocol used by network devices for advertising their identity, capabilities, and neighbors on a WLAN.

    Note: LLDP and LLDP-MED cannot operate simultaneously on a network. By default, a network device sends only LLDP packets until LLDP-MED packets are received from an endpoint device, after which the network device sends out LLDP-MED packets until it receives LLDP packets.

    LLDP-MED Mode
    (default is enabled)

    LLDP-MED, an extension to LLDP that operates between endpoint devices such as IP phones, and network devices, such as switches, is enabled by default. Specifically, it provides support for voice over IP (VoIP) applications and provides additional TLVs for the capabilities discover, network policy, Power over Ethernet (PoE), and inventory management. Options are enabled and disabled.

    Note: LLDP and LLDP-MED cannot operate simultaneously on a network. By default, a network device sends only LLDP packets until LLDP-MED packets are received from an endpoint device, after which the network device sends out LLDP-MED packets until it receives LLDP packets.

    Power via MDI
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable to have LLDP-MED use the medium dependent interface (MDI) power management TLV for power over Ethernet (PoE).

    Enable Inventory
    (default is disabled)

    Select Enable Inventory to have LLDP-MED use the Inventory TLV, enabling you to track inventory for network devices, including their manufacturer, software and hardware versions, and serial or asset number. Options for inventory are enabled and disabled if you have enabled LLDP-MED.

    Enable Remote AP Settings

    Remote AP Settings, enabled by default, apply to access points connected by a WAN link to a central network. If the WAN link becomes unavailable, then the remote sites with access points remain active and continue to provide connectivity to wireless clients, using the settings indicated here.

    Outage Duration
    (default is 0 hours)

    Select the amount of time in hours that remote sites with access points should remain active and continue to provide connectivity to wireless clients if the WAN link becomes unavailable.

    If Enable Remote AP Settings is selected, outage duration indicates the number of hours that access points remain in outage mode once they lose connection with a controller. The valid times are from 0 to 120 hours (5 days). The default setting, zero, means access points stay in outage mode indefinitely.

    Connection Evaluation Period
    (default is 300 seconds)

    Select the amount of time in seconds that a keep-alive interval of pings is sent to detect an active link for remote access points. The default value is 300 seconds and the range is 5 through 86400 seconds.

    When Enable Remote AP Settings is selected and an outage occurs, a periodic timer sends discovery messages to the primary access manager (PAM) to determine when the controller is available on the network again. This timer, called an evaluation timer, is configurable and can be used as a hold-down timer to confirm detection of the WAN outage and as a mechanism to detect when the connection is restored.

    Click either Next or Advanced Settings to continue configuring the Auto AP. Follow the directions Specifying Advanced Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile to complete that section of the wizard.

    Specifying Advanced Settings for a Wireless Auto AP Profile

    Advanced Auto AP settings include broadcast settings, client types, and voice configuration. The only required configuration here is the name of a VLAN profile to use with the Auto AP profile. Table 4 lists the advanced settings and how to configure them.

    Table 4: Wireless Auto AP Profile Advanced Settings

    Field

    Action

    Blink
    (disabled by default)

    Enable LED blink mode on access points to make them easy to identify. When blink mode is enabled on supporting models, the health and radio LEDs alternately blink green and amber. When blink mode is enabled on an AP2750, the 802.11a LED blinks on and off.

    Data Security
    (disabled by default)

    Enable data security to configure access points with data path encryption.

    High Latency Mode
    (disabled by default)

    Enable high latency for this automatic configuration.

    Bonjour Profile

    To make the automatic configuration include Bonjour, enable this option.

    Firmware Update
    (enabled by default)

    Disable this option if you do not want the controller to update access points with firmware upgrades.

    LED Mode
    (default is Auto)

    Select the LED behavior for access points in this profile, Auto, Static, or Off. Auto is standard behavior. Static LEDs do not flash when traffic is on the network but all other behavior is standard. Selecting Off turns LEDs off.

    AP Communication Timeout
    (default is 25 seconds)

    Indicate the length of time in seconds that an access point waits for communication from a controller before timing out.

    Enable Local Switching
    (default is enabled)

    Local switching causes traffic that was tunneled to a controller to be locally switched by access points. Local switching includes the following additional settings:

    WLA Local Switch VLAN Profile

    When a VLAN profile is applied to an access point, traffic for that VLAN is locally switched by the access point—that is, traffic directly exits the access point into the VLAN instead of tunneling back to a controller for switching.

    If Local Switching is enabled, you can apply a VLAN profile to access points to use with local switching:

    1. Click Add.
    2. Select an existing VLAN profile from the list.
    3. Click OK.

      The VLAN profile is now associated with this Auto AP profile and will be used to locally switch traffic between access points. The VLAN profile name, VLAN name, device family, VLAN ID and device description are added to the list of VLAN profiles.

    If Local Switching is enabled and a VLAN has been added here, you can select a VLAN profile from the list, and then click Clear to remove the VLAN from local switching in this Auto AP profile.

    Tunnel Affinity
    (default is 4)

    If Local Switching is enabled, tunnel affinity enables access points with Local Switching enabled to create and terminate client VLAN tunnels—a VLAN is not required on these access points. Affinity is the capacity that an AP has for tunnels. An AP can have affinity for 0 (none) to 10 tunnels, with the default of 4 tunnels. Zero indicates that the access point is not used as a tunnel endpoint.

    AP Tunneling
    (default is disabled)

    If Local Switching is enabled, AP Tunneling configures tunneling on the access points in this profile. If a client connects to an access point that has local switching enabled on a VLAN, and the VLAN does not exist in the VLAN profile, then the client connects in overlay mode. This setting enables clients to still connect if the tunnel limits (set by the Tunnel Affinity value) are reached. If a client cannot connect, an appropriate error message is recorded in the event log.

    Click either Next or Review to continue configuring the Auto AP. Follow the directions Reviewing a Wireless Auto AP Profile to complete that section of the wizard.

    Reviewing a Wireless Auto AP Profile

    Before you create the Auto AP profile, check the configuration:

    1. Review your Auto AP service profile selections by scrolling to the bottom of the screen.
    2. Make any needed changes by clicking Edit in the appropriate section. Make the changes, and then return to the Review tab.
    3. Click Finish. The Auto AP profile appears in the Auto AP profile list.

    What To Do Next

    Next, assign the Auto AP configuration to one or more controllers, following the directions Assigning an Auto AP Profile to Controllers.

    Modified: 2016-12-08