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    Configuring Interface Redundancy

    The MobileNext Broadband Gateway chassis includes a number of interface Packet Forwarding Engines housed on Dense Port Concentrators (DPCs) or Modular Port Concentrators (MPCs) (we recommend at least two DPCs or MPCs). Each Packet Forwarding Engine consists of two or four Packet Forwarding Engines, depending on the DPC or MPC type. These are PFE0 and PFE1 (or optionally, PFE2 and PFE3). Some Packet Forwarding Engines are designated as anchor devices, and keep various parameters for the data plane traffic flow. Packets related to a particular flow must be processed by an anchor Packet Forwarding Engine.

    Before you begin configuring session DPC redundancy on a broadband gateway chassis, you should have done the following:

    • Configured the chassis of the broadband gateway
    • Configured the interface DPCs or MPCs used for mobility

    The interface Packet Forwarding Engines offer N:1 redundancy. That is, a configured number of interface Packet Forwarding Engines (N) are backed up by one warm standby Packet Forwarding Engine. Optionally, you can group Packet Forwarding Engines for redundancy purposes so that each member of the group shares the same fate.

    To configure interface redundancy for mobility, you select a list of interface Packet Forwarding Engines to place on the active (primary) list. Then you select a different Packet Forwarding Engine to act as the secondary (standby) Packet Forwarding Engine for all Packet Forwarding Engines in the active group.

    To configure group membership and redundancy actions for a number of interface DPCs or MPCs on a broadband gateway:

    1. Configure the interface DPC or MPC redundancy list called apfe0 with all Packet Forwarding Engines in FPC slot 2 and 3 backed up in warm standby by the Packet Forwarding Engines in FPC slot 4.
      [edit interfaces]user@host# set apfe0 anchoring-options primary-list fpc-2 user@host# set apfe0 anchoring-options primary-list fpc-3 user@host# set apfe0 anchoring-options secondary fpc-4 user@host# set apfe0 anchoring-options warm-standby

      Note: The warm-standby option is the only mode currently supported. In this configuration (for example) ge-2/0/0 is backed up by ge-4/0/0, ge-2/1/0 is backed up by ge-4/1/0, and so on.

    2. Alternatively, configure the interface DPC or MPC redundancy list called apfe1 with a Packet-Forwarding-Engine-by-Packet-Forwarding-Engine list of redundant components.
      [edit interfaces]user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-7/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-8/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options secondary pfe-9/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options warm-standby

      Note: The warm-standby option is the only mode currently supported. In this configuration (for example), ge-7/0/0 or ge-8/0/0 is backed up by ge-9/0/0 in case of failure, but not ge-7/1/0.

    3. Optionally, you can configure a group name for Packet-Forwarding-Engine-level redundancy apfe1 and apfe2 so that all components share the same fate.
      [edit interfaces]user@host# set apfe1 apfe-group-set apfe-group-name1 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-7/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-8/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options secondary pfe-9/0/0 user@host# set apfe1 anchoring-options warm-standby user@host# set apfe2 apfe-group-set apfe-group-name1 user@host# set apfe2 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-7/2/0 user@host# set apfe2 anchoring-options primary-list pfe-8/2/0 user@host# set apfe2 anchoring-options secondary pfe-9/2/0 user@host# set apfe2 anchoring-options warm-standby

    Published: 2011-11-22