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    Example: Debugging Connectivity Using Monitoring for Troubleshooting

    Using Monitoring to Debug Connectivity

    This example shows how you can use monitoring to debug connectivity in your Contrail system. You can use the demo setup in Contrail to use these steps on your own.

    1. Navigate to Monitor -> Networking -> Networks -> default-domain:demo:vn0, Instance ed6abd16-250e-4ec5-a382-5cbc458fb0ca with IP address 192.168.0.252 in the virtual network vn0; see Figure 1

      Figure 1: Navigate to Instance

      Navigate to Instance
    2. Click the instance to view Traffic Statistics for Instance. see Figure 2.

      Figure 2: Traffic Statistics for Instance

      Traffic Statistics for Instance
    3. Instance d26c0b31-c795-400e-b8be-4d3e6de77dcf with IP address 192.168.0.253 in the virtual network vn16. see Figure 3 and Figure 4.

      Figure 3: Navigate to Instance

      Navigate to Instance

      Figure 4: Traffic Statistics for Instance

      Traffic Statistics for Instance
    4. From Monitor->Infrastructure->Virtual Routers->a3s18->Interfaces, we can see that Instance ed6abd16-250e-4ec5-a382-5cbc458fb0ca is hosted on Virtual Router a3s18; see Figure 5.

      Figure 5: Navigate to a3s18 Interfaces

      Navigate to a3s18 Interfaces
    5. From Monitor->Infrastructure->Virtual Routers->a3s19->Interfaces, we can see that Instance d26c0b31-c795-400e-b8be-4d3e6de77dcf is hosted on Virtual Router a3s19; see Figure 6.

      Figure 6: Navigate to a3s19 Interfaces

      Navigate to a3s19 Interfaces
    6. Virtual Routers a3s18 and a3s19 have the ACL entries to allow connectivity between default-domain:demo:vn0 and default-domain:demo:vn16 networks; see Figure 7 and Figure 8.

      Figure 7: ACL Connectivity a3s18

      ACL Connectivity a3s18

      Figure 8: ACL Connectivity a3s19

      ACL Connectivity a3s19
    7. Next, verify the routes on the control node for routing instances default-domain:demo:vn0:vn0 and default-domain:demo:vn16:vn16; see Figure 9 and Figure 10.

      Figure 9: Routes default-domain:demo:vn0:vn0

      Routes default-domain:demo:vn0:vn0

      Figure 10: Routes default-domain:demo:vn16:vn16

      Routes default-domain:demo:vn16:vn16
    8. We can see that VRF default-domain:demo:vn0:vn0 on Virtual Router a3s18 has the appropriate route and next hop to reach VRF default-domain:demo:front-end on Virtual Router a3s19; see Figure 11.

      Figure 11: Verify Route and Next Hop a3s18

      Verify Route and Next Hop a3s18
    9. We can see that VRF default-domain:demo:vn16:vn16 on Virtual Router a3s19 has the appropriate route and next hop to reach VRF default-domain:demo:vn0:vn0 on Virtual Router a3s18; see Figure 12.

      Figure 12: Verify Route and Next Hop a3s19

      Verify Route and Next Hop a3s19
    10. Finally, flows between instances (IPs 192.168.0.252 and 192.168.16.253) can be verified on Virtual Routers a3s18 and a3s19; see Figure 13 and Figure 14.

      Figure 13: Flows for a3s18

      Flows for a3s18

      Figure 14: Flows for a3s19

      Flows for a3s19

    Modified: 2015-09-02