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    Service Visualization

    The proNX Service Manager Dashboard allows you to visualize services in the managed network. The services are shown in both tabular and graphical form, displaying connectivity, state, and alarm information for each service using icons, tooltips, and embedded links that lead you to related information.

    The following services can be visualized:

    • transport services on BTI7800 Series equipment
    • transport services on BTI7000 Series equipment
    • optical services on BTI7800 Series equipment
    • optical services on BTI7000 Series equipment with BTI7000 Series DOL port endpoints
    • optical services on BTI7000 Series equipment with BTI7800 Series, MX Series, PTX Series, or QFX Series interface endpoints
    • Ethernet E(V)PLINE and E(V)PLAN services on BTI7000 Series equipment
    • Ethernet E(V)PLINE and E(V)PLAN services on BTI718E equipment
    • Ethernet E(V)PLINE and E(V)PLAN services on BTI800 Series equipment

    Note: Visualization of transport service interworking between a BTI7000 Series network element and a BTI7800 Series network element is not supported.

    A service can be thought of as the conduit over which endpoints transfer data, where the endpoints can be internal or external to the network. A service is confined to a single layer, but can run over other services to give the appearance of spanning multiple layers. For example, a SONET/SDH transport service can run over the transmission medium directly, or it can run over a wavelength service in an optical network. Another example is an Ethernet service that runs over a transport service that runs over an optical service.

    To handle these myriad combinations, the proNX Service Manager Dashboard adopts a generic layer network architecture that allows you to visualize a service at its native layer and expand it as desired to show the lower layer services that it uses. The same look and feel is presented regardless of the layer.

    Table 1 shows the icons used in the service visualization display.

    Table 1: Service Visualization Icons and Descriptions

    Icon

    Description

    or

    A service endpoint, which is typically a port on a network element. It is green if the endpoint is up, red if the endpoint is down.

    An endpoint link between a service endpoint and the network element in which the endpoint resides. It is always grey.

    A network element. It is always black.

    or

    A logical link between network elements. A logical link is a link that runs over a lower layer service. It is green if the link endpoints at this layer are up, red if the link endpoints at this layer are down.

    or

    Located next to a logical link, used to expand or hide the display of the lower layer service.

    An adaptation point from an upper layer service to a lower layer service. This represents the transition between the upper layer service and the lower layer service.

    or

    A physical link. It is green if the link is up, red if the link is down.

    or or

    An alarm indication. The color indicates the highest severity alarm outstanding. If an alarm exists, the alarm indication appears in the upper right corner of a network element or a service endpoint.

    The following are examples of service visualization in the proNX Service Manager Dashboard. The display shows the endpoints of the service and how the endpoints are connected in the network. Additional information, including state information and alarms counts, appears in tooltips when you hover over the endpoints, network elements, and links. For illustration purposes, the following examples show multiple tooltips simultaneously.

    Note: The alarms counts for a service endpoint include all alarms affecting the service at the service endpoint port and on all containing equipment such as the containing module, shelf/chassis, and common equipment. The alarms counts for a network element include all alarms on the network element that affect the service excluding the alarms on the service endpoint port.

    Transponding Service Visualization

    Figure 1 shows a basic transponding service (10GELAN to/from 10GELAN EFEC) within a single network element.

    Figure 1: Transponding Within a Single Network Element

    Transponding Within a Single Network Element

    Muxponding Service Visualization

    Figure 2 shows a muxponding service (40GE to/from an ODU3 within an OTU4 to/from 40GE) across two network elements.

    Figure 2: Muxponding Across Network Elements

    Muxponding Across Network Elements

    Optical Service Visualization

    Figure 3 shows an optical service across two network elements. The service endpoints are the add/drop ports at the ROADM module at each end.

    Figure 3: Optical Service Across Network Elements

    Optical Service Across Network Elements

    Ethernet Service Visualization

    Figure 4 shows an Ethernet service. If the service spans an ERPS ring, the ERPS ring is represented by an icon showing its name and state.

    Figure 4: Ethernet Service Across Network Elements

    Ethernet Service Across Network Elements

    If the service contains a multi-chassis LAG UNI, only the active link is shown.

    Figure 5: Ethernet Service with a Multi-chassis LAG

    Ethernet Service with a Multi-chassis LAG

    If the service has more than two endpoints, PSM automatically picks two endpoints to display and provides an Endpoints button in the upper left corner of the view to allow you to select a different pair of endpoints. Only two endpoints can be displayed at any time. The Endpoints selector is shown in Figure 6.

    Figure 6: Ethernet Service Endpoints Selector

    Ethernet Service Endpoints Selector

    Multi-layer Service Visualization

    Figure 7 shows a transponding service between two network elements where the link between the two network elements runs over a wavelength provided by an optical service. By expanding on the logical link, you can see the underlying optical service. The adaptation points represent the transition between the upper layer service and the lower layer service.

    Note that a logical link can be down while the lower layer service is up, but a logical link cannot be up when the lower layer service is down.

    Note: Multi-layer service visualization for Ethernet services is not supported.

    Figure 7: Transponding Over an Optical Service

    Transponding Over an Optical Service

    Modified: 2017-11-07