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    Creating a BTI7800 System Repair Drive

    BTI7800 software is released as an RPM as well as a USB image. The RPM is used for regular software installation while the USB image is used to create a system repair drive.

    A system repair drive is a USB drive that can be used to boot up and install software on a BTI7800 CMM. The system repair drive contains the USB image of the software release you want to install along with some basic utilities.

    Using Linux to Create a BTI7800 System Repair Drive

    Use this procedure on Linux to create a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Prerequisites

    1. Determine the assigned names of the existing drives on the Linux PC.

      For example:

      $ ls -l /dev/disk/by-id/ 
      total 0 
      drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 320 Jul 10 08:51 ./ 
      drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 100 Jul  9 09:37 ../ 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-GCR-8483B -> ../../sr1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-LG_CD-RW_CED-8120B -> ../../sr0 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE -> ../../sda 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part1 -> ../../sda1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part2 -> ../../sda2 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part5 -> ../../sda5 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE -> ../../sda 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part1 -> ../../sda1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part2 -> ../../sda2 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part5 -> ../../sda5 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jul  9 09:27 usb-Verbatim_STORE_N_GO_070233A4889E0848-0:0 -> ../../sdb 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jul  9 09:28 usb-Verbatim_STORE_N_GO_070233A4889E0848-0:0-part1 -> ../../sdb1 
    2. Attach the USB drive to your Linux PC.
    3. Determine the name that Linux has assigned to the newly attached USB drive by re-issuing the same command.

      For example:

      $ ls -l /dev/disk/by-id/ 
      total 0 
      drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 320 Jul 10 08:51 ./ 
      drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 100 Jul  9 09:37 ../ 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-GCR-8483B -> ../../sr1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-LG_CD-RW_CED-8120B -> ../../sr0 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE -> ../../sda 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part1 -> ../../sda1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part2 -> ../../sda2 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 ata-Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part5 -> ../../sda5 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE -> ../../sda 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part1 -> ../../sda1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part2 -> ../../sda2 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jun 16 08:02 scsi-SATA_Maxtor_6E040L0_E1MWYCDE-part5 -> ../../sda5 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jul 10 08:51 usb-Kingston_DT_100_G2_0019E06B0840CCA06702241A-0:0 -> ../../sdc 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jul 10 08:51 usb-Kingston_DT_100_G2_0019E06B0840CCA06702241A-0:0-part1 -> ../../sdc1 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   9 Jul  9 09:27 usb-Verbatim_STORE_N_GO_070233A4889E0848-0:0 -> ../../sdb 
      lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Jul  9 09:28 usb-Verbatim_STORE_N_GO_070233A4889E0848-0:0-part1 -> ../../sdb1 

      In this example, the new USB drive is /dev/sdc.

    4. If your Linux is configured to automount USB devices, then you must unmount the USB drive.
      1. Check if the USB drive is mounted.

        For example:

        $ df 
        Filesystem     1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on 
        /dev/sda1       38485652 15095980  21434704  42% / 
        udev              504448        4    504444   1% /dev 
        tmpfs             102352      652    101700   1% /run 
        none                5120        0      5120   0% /run/lock 
        none              511756        0    511756   0% /run/shm 
        /dev/sdc1       15130624   883536  14247088   6% /mnt/usb2 

        In this example, the partition /dev/sdc1 is mounted at mount point /mnt/usb2. If your USB drive is not mounted, proceed to 5.

      2. Unmount the USB drive partition.

        For example:

        $ sudo umount /mnt/usb2
    5. Use the command line disk imaging utility to transfer the USB image onto the USB drive. A disk imaging utility restores a drive image to a drive.

      For example:

      Caution: This command erases all data on the target USB drive. Ensure you specify the correct USB drive in this command.

      $ ls 
      bti7800-usb-1.6.0  
      
      $ sudo dd if=./bti7800-usb-1.6.0 of=/dev/sd bs=10M 
      Password:  
      
      731+1 records in 
      731+1 records out 
      7665960960 bytes (7.7 GB) copied, 630.255 s, 12.2 MB/s 
      $

      where if is the input file (name of the USB image), and of is the output file (path to the USB drive). All drives are located in the /dev directory.

      Note: This process might take a few minutes on faster USB drives, and up to 30 minutes on slower USB drives. No indication of progress is provided.

    6. Remove the USB drive.

    You have created a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Using Mac OS X to Create a BTI7800 System Repair Drive

    Use this procedure on Mac OS X to create a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Prerequisites

    1. Open Launchpad and select Disk Utility.

      The Disk Utility window appears. This window lists all the drives in the system.

      In this example, the only hard drive in the system is the internal hard drive. If you have existing USB drives attached, you will see them listed here.

    2. Attach the USB drive to your Mac.

      The newly attached USB drive appears in the Disk Utility window.

    3. Determine the name that Mac OS X has assigned to the newly attached USB drive.

      Highlight the USB drive entry and click the Info icon.

      The Information window appears with more detailed information on the USB drive.

      In this example, the Disk Identifier assigned by Mac OS X to this drive is disk3.

    4. Unmount the USB drive partition. The partition must be unmounted to prevent access during the imaging process.

      Select the USB drive partition entry and click Unmount.

    5. Use the built-in command line disk imaging utility to transfer the USB image onto the USB drive. A disk imaging utility restores a drive image to a drive.

      Open a Terminal session and navigate to the location that contains the USB image.

      Caution: The imaging command erases all data on the target USB drive. Ensure you specify the correct USB drive in this command. In this example, the USB drive is disk3. Your USB drive assignment might be different.

      For example:

      $ ls 
      bti7800-usb-1.6.0  
      
      $ sudo dd if=./bti7800-usb-1.6.0 of=/dev/disk3 bs=10m 
      Password:  
      
      731+1 records in 
      731+1 records out 
      7665960960 bytes transferred in 1440.480677 secs (5321808 bytes/sec) 
      $

      where if is the input file (name of the USB image), and of is the output file (path to the USB drive). All drives are located in the /dev directory.

      Note: This process might take a couple of minutes on faster USB drives and up to 30 minutes on slower USB drives. No indication of progress is provided.

    6. Eject the USB drive by clicking the Eject icon.

    You have created a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Using Windows to Create a BTI7800 System Repair Drive

    Use this procedure on Windows 7 to create a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Prerequisites

    • A Windows 7 PC with a USB 3.0 port.

      Note: This procedure assumes the use of Windows 7. The procedure might be different for other versions of Windows.

    • A USB 3.0 flash drive (minimum 8GB).
    • A disk imager. This procedure uses the Win32 Disk Imager.
    • The BTI7800 USB image (can be downloaded from http://www.juniper.net/support/downloads). The software is provided as a gzipped file. You must gunzip the downloaded file before starting this procedure. See Retrieving a BTI7800 Software Image for more information.
    1. Open Windows Explorer and click on Computer to see all the drives in the system.
    2. Attach the USB drive to your PC.

      The newly attached drive should appear in the window with a new drive letter assigned.

    3. Launch a disk imaging application (for example, Win32 Disk Imager). A disk imaging application is used to restore a drive image to a drive.

      For example:

    4. Select the USB image file by clicking on the Browse icon.

      In the resulting dialog, navigate to the location where the USB image resides, select it, and click Open.

      Note: By default, this program only shows *.img and *.IMG files. To show all files, change the filter to show *.*.

    5. Select the target USB drive in the Device drop-down menu.

      Caution: The imaging program erases all data on the target USB drive. Ensure you specify the correct USB drive in this command. In this example, the USB drive is E. Your USB drive assignment might be different.

    6. Write the image to the USB drive by clicking on Write.

      For example:

    7. When the process completes, a Write Successful message appears. Click OK.
    8. Eject the USB drive.

    You have created a system repair drive that can be used to boot a BTI7800 CMM from the USB port.

    Modified: 2017-10-24