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New Features in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series Routers

Powered by Junos OS, the ACX Series Universal Access Routers provide superior management for rapid provisioning to the access network. They are designed to support residential, mobile, and business access. The ACX Series routers include the ACX1000, the ACX1100, the ACX2000, the ACX2200, and the ACX4000 routers.

The following are key features of the ACX Series routers:

  • High performance up to 10 Gigabit Ethernet capable
  • Seamless MPLS traffic engineering for optimal paths and per-customer quality of service in the access layer
  • Built-in Precision Timing Protocol (PTP) and Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE) to eliminate dropped calls and data retransmissions
  • Environmentally hardened with 65 W Power over Ethernet (PoE)

The following features have been added to Junos OS Release 12.3 for the ACX Series Universal Access Routers. Following the description is the title of the manual or manuals to consult for further information:

Hardware

  • New ACX4000 Universal Access Router—Starting in Release 12.3, Junos OS supports the ACX4000 router. This router enables a wide range of business and residential applications and services, including microwave cell site aggregation, MSO mobile backhaul service cell site deployment, and service provider or operator cell site deployment.

    The ACX4000 supports use of either four RJ-45 ports or four Gigabit Ethernet SFP transceivers. The ACX4000 also contains an additional two PoE ports, two Gigabit Ethernet SFPs, and two 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ transceivers. The router has two dedicated slots for MICs. For a list of the supported MICs, see the ACX4000 Universal Access Router MIC Guide.

    [ACX4000 Hardware Guide]

Firewall Filters

  • Filter-based forwarding for routing instances—For IPv4 traffic only, you can use stateless firewall filters in routing instances to control how packets travel in a network. This is called filter-based forwarding.

    You can define a firewall filtering term that directs matching packets to a specified routing instance. This type of filtering can be configured to route specific types of traffic through a firewall or other security device before the traffic continues on its path. To configure a stateless firewall filter to direct traffic to a routing instance, configure a term with the routing-instance routing-instance-name terminating action at the [edit firewall family inet filter filter-name term term-name then] hierarchy level to specify the routing instance to which matching packets will be forwarded. To configure the filter to direct traffic to the master routing instance, use the routing-instance default statement at the [edit firewall family inet filter filter-name term term-name then] hierarchy level.

    [ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide]

  • Forwarding table filters for routing instances—Forwarding table filter is a mechanism by which all the packets forwarded by a certain forwarding table are subjected to filtering and if a packet matches the filter condition, the configured action is applied on the packet. You can use the forwarding table filter mechanism to apply a filter on all interfaces associated with a single routing instance with a simple configuration. You can apply a forwarding table filter to a routing instance of type forwarding and also to the default routing instance inet.0. To configure a forwarding table filter, include the filter filter-name statement at the [edit firewall family inet] hierarchy level.

    [ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide]

Interfaces and Chassis

  • New Channelized OC3/STM1 (Multi-Rate) Circuit Emulation MIC with SFP (ACX-MIC-4COC3-1COC12CE) on ACX Series Universal Access Routers—Starting with Junos OS Release 12.3, a new MIC, Channelized OC3/STM1 (Multi-Rate) Circuit Emulation MIC with SFP (ACX-MIC-4COC3-1COC12CE), is supported on ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
  • Support for 6xGE MIC on ACX4000 Universal Access Router—The ACX4000 now supports 6xGE MICs. The 6xGE MIC features six tri-speed (10/100/1000Gbps) Ethernet ports. Each port can be configured to operate in either RJ-45 or SFP mode.
  • Junos OS support for chassis management (ACX4000)—The following CLI operational mode commands are supported on the ACX4000:

    Show commands:

    • show chassis alarms
    • show chassis craft-interface
    • show chassis environment
    • show chassis environment pem
    • show chassis fan
    • show chassis firmware
    • show chassis fpc pic-status
    • show chassis hardware (clei-models | detail | extensive | models)
    • show chassis mac-addresses
    • show chassis pic fpc-slot fpc-slot pic-slot pic slot
    • show chassis routing-engine

    Restart command:

    • restart chassis-control (gracefully | immediately | soft)

    Request commands:

    • request chassis feb restart slot slot-number
    • request chassis mic mic-slot mic-slot fpc-slot fpc-slot (offline | online)
    • request chassis pic offline fpc-slot fpc-slot pic-slot pic-slot

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide and the System Basics: Chassis-Level Features Configuration Guide.]

  • User-defined alarms—On an ACX Series router, the alarm contact port (labeled ALARM) provides four user-defined input ports and two user-defined output ports. Whenever a system condition occurs—such as a rise in temperature, and depending on the configuration, the input or output port is activated. The following configuration is supported for user-defined alarms:
    [edit chassis alarm relay]input {port port-number {mode (close | open);trigger (ignore | red | yellow;}}output {port port-number {input-relay input-relay {port port-number;}mode (close | open);temperature;}}

    To view the alarm relay information, issue the show chassis craft-interface command from the Junos OS command-line interface.

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide and the System Basics: Chassis-Level Features Configuration Guide. For a detailed description of the alarm contact port, see the relevant hardware guide for your router.]

Layer 2 and Layer 3 Protocols

  • IPv6 Support—IPv6 builds upon the functionality of IPv4, providing improvements to addressing, configuration and maintenance, and security. The following IPv6 features are supported on ACX Series routers:
    • Dual stacking (IPv4 and IPv6)
    • Dynamic routes distribution through IS-IS and OSPF for IPv6
    • Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) v6
    • IPv6 forwarding
    • IPv6 over MPLS (6PE)
    • IPv6 path maximum transmission unit (MTU) discovery
    • Neighbor discovery
    • Static routes for IPv6

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide and the Junos OS Routing Protocols Configuration Guide.]

Routing Protocols

  • Support for Layer 3 VPNs for IPv4 and IPv6 address families—You can configure Layer 3 virtual private network (VPN) routing instances on ACX Series routers at the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols] hierarchy level for unicast IPv4, multicast IPv4, unicast IPv6, and multicast IPv6 address families. If you do not explicitly specify the address family in an IPv4 or an IPv6 environment, the router is configured to exchange unicast IPv4 or unicast IPv6 addresses by default. You can also configure the router to exchange unicast IPv4 and unicast IPv6 routes in a specified VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) routing instance. If you specify the multicast IPv4 or multicast IPv6 address family in the configuration, you can use BGP to exchange routing information about how packets reach a multicast source, instead of a unicast destination, for transmission to endpoints.

    Only the forwarding and virtual router routing instances support unicast IPv6 and multicast IPv6 address families. Unicast IPv6 and multicast IPv6 address families are not supported for VRF routing instances.

    A VRF routing instance is a BGP and MPLS VPN environment in which BGP is used to exchange IP VPN routes and discover the remote site, and VPN traffic traverses an MPLS tunnel in an IP and MPLS backbone. You can enable an ACX Series router to function as a provider edge (PE) router by configuring VRF routing instances.

    You can configure the following types of Layer 3 routing instances:

    • Forwarding—Use this routing instance type for filter-based forwarding applications.
    • Virtual router—A virtual router routing instance is similar to a VRF instance type, but is used for non-VPN-related applications.
    • VRF—Use the VRF routing instance type for Layer 3 VPN implementations. This routing instance type has a VPN routing table as well as a corresponding VPN forwarding table. For this instance type, there is a one-to-one mapping between an interface and a routing instance. Each VRF routing instance corresponds with a forwarding table. Routes on an interface go into the corresponding forwarding table. This routing instance type is used to implement BGP or MPLS VPNs in service provider networks or in big enterprise topologies.

    [ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide]

  • Support for Multiprotocol BGP—Multiprotocol BGP (MP-BGP) is an extension to BGP that enables BGP to carry routing information for multiple network layers and address families. MP-BGP can carry the unicast routes used for multicast routing separately from the routes used for unicast IP forwarding.

    You can configure MP-BGP on ACX Series routers for IPv4 and IPv6 address families in the following ways:

    • To enable MP-BGP to carry network layer reachability information (NLRI) for address families other than unicast IPv4, include the family inet statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.
    • To enable MP-BGP to carry NLRI for the IPv6 address family, include the family inet6 statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.
    • To enable MP-BGP to carry Layer 3 virtual private network (VPN) NLRI for the IPv4 address family, include the family inet-vpn statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.
    • To enable MP-BGP to carry Layer 3 VPN NLRI for the IPv6 address family, include the family inet6-vpn statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.
    • To enable MP-BGP to carry multicast VPN NLRI for the IPv4 address family and to enable VPN signaling, include the family inet-mvpn statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.
    • To enable MP-BGP to carry multicast VPN NLRI for the IPv6 address family and to enable VPN signaling, include the family inet6-mvpn statement at the [edit protocols bgp] or the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp] hierarchy level.

    [ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide]

Time Division Multiplexing (TDM)

  • TDM CESoPSN (ACX1000 and ACX2000 routers)—Structure-Aware Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) Circuit Emulation Service over Packet Switched Network (CESoPSN) is a method of encapsulating TDM signals into CESoPSN packets, and in the reverse direction, decapsulating CESoPSN packets back into TDM signals—also, referred to as Interworking Function (IWF). The following CESoPSN features are supported:
    • Channelization up to the ds0 level—The following numbers of NxDS0 pseudowires are supported for 16 T1 and E1 built-in ports and 8 T1 and E1 built-in ports.

      16 T1 and E1 built-in ports support the following number of pseudowires:

      • Each T1 port can have up to 24 NxDS0 pseudowires, which add up to a total of up to 384 NxDS0 pseudowires.
      • Each E1 port can have up to 31 NxDS0 pseudowires, which add up to a total of up to 496 NxDS0 pseudowires.

      8 T1 and E1 built-in ports support the following number of pseudowires:

      • Each T1 port can have up to 24 NxDS0 pseudowires, which add up to a total of up to 192 NxDS0 pseudowires.
      • Each E1 port can have up to 31 NxDS0 pseudowires, which add up to a total of up to 248 NxDS0 pseudowires.
    • Protocol support—All protocols that support Structure Agnostic TDM over Packet (SAToP) support CESoPSN NxDS0 interfaces.
    • Packet latency—The time required to create packets (from 1000 through 8000 microseconds).
    • CESoPSN encapsulation—The following statements are supported at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level:
      • ct1-x/y/z partition partition-number timeslots timeslots interface-type ds
      • ds-x/y/z:n encapsulation cesopsn
    • CESoPSN options—The following statements are supported at the [edit interfaces interface-name cesopsn-options] hierarchy level:
      • excessive-packet-loss-rate (sample-period milliseconds)
      • idle-pattern pattern
      • jitter-buffer-latency milliseconds
      • jitter-buffer-packets packets
      • packetization-latency microseconds
    • Interfaces show commands—The show interfaces interface-name extensive command is supported for t1, e1, and at interfaces.
    • CESoPSN pseudowires—CESoPSN pseudowires are configured on the logical interface, not on the physical interface. So the unit logical-unit-number statement must be included in the configuration at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level. When you include the unit logical-unit-number statement, Circuit Cross Connect (CCC) for the logical interface is created automatically.

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide.]

Timing and Synchronization

  • IEEE 1588v2 boundary clock—The boundary clock has multiple network connections and can act as a source (master) or destination (backup) for synchronization messages. The boundary clock intercepts and processes all Precision Time Protocol (PTP) messages and passes all other traffic. The best master clock algorithm (BMCA) is used by the boundary clock to select the best clock from configured acceptable masters. On ACX Series routers, you can configure a port as a boundary backup or as a boundary master. To configure a boundary clock, include the boundary statement at the [edit protocols ptp clock-mode] hierarchy level.

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide.]

  • PTP master boundary clock—On an ACX Series router, the Precision Time Protocol (PTP) master clock sends unicast packets over UDP to the clients (ordinary and boundary) so they can establish their relative time offset from this master clock. To configure a master clock, include the master statement and options at the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level. On an ACX Series router, you can configure up to 512 remote clock clients. The following configuration is supported for the master boundary clock:
    [edit protocols ptp master]announce-interval announce-interval-value;
    interface interface-name {unicast-mode {clock-client ip-address local-ip-address local-ip-address {manual;}}transport ipv4;}
    max-announce-interval max-announce-interval;max-delay-response-interval max-delay-response-interval;max-sync-interval max-sync-interval;min-announce-interval min-announce-interval;min-delay-response-interval min-delay-response-interval;min-sync-interval min-sync-interval;sync-interval sync-interval;

    Note: You must include the boundary statement at the [edit protocols ptp clock-mode] hierarchy level and at least one slave with the slave statement at the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level for the remote master configuration to work

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide.]

  • Clock clients—A clock client is the remote PTP host, which receives time from the PTP master and is in a slave relationship to the master. The maximum number of configured clock clients is 512. The clock client is included in the configuration of the master clock. Three different types of downstream clients are supported. You can configure any combination of these three types of clients for a given master.
    • Automatic client—For an automatic client, you do not need to configure the exact IP address of the host. Instead, configure a subnet mask for the automatic client, and any host belonging to that subnet can join the master clock through a unicast negotiation—which is a method by which the announce, synchronization, and delay response packet rates are negotiated between the master and the slave before a Precision Time Protocol (PTP) session is established. To configure an automatic client, include the clock-client ip-address local-ip-address local-ip-address statement at the [edit protocols ptp master interface interface-name unicast-mode] hierarchy level. Include the subnet mask of the remote PTP host in the clock-client ip-address statement and the boundary master clock IP address in the local-ip-address local-ip-address statement.
    • Manual client—When you configure a manual client, the client immediately receives announce and synchronization packets. To configure a manual client, include the manual statement at the [edit protocols ptp master interface interface-name unicast-mode clock-client ip-address local-ip-address local-ip-address] hierarchy level.
    • Secure client—For a secure client, you must configure a full and exact IP address, after which it joins the master clock through unicast negotiation. To configure a secure client, include the clock-client ip-address statement with the exact IP address of the PTP host at the [edit protocols ptp master interface interface-name unicast-mode] hierarchy level.

    Note: You can configure the maximum number of clients (512 ) in the following combination:

    • Automatic clients 256.
    • Manual and secure clients 256—Any combination of manual and secure clients is allowed as long as the combined total amounts to 256.

    [See the ACX Series Universal Access Router Configuration Guide.]

Related Documentation

Modified: 2016-06-09